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Features

  • August is upon us with its hot, muggy weather. Totally unlike most Colorado weather, it is my least favorite month of the year. Monsoon winds coming up out of the gulf or from Southern California are moist enough to bring humid air but unfortunately are all too often not moist enough to bring rain. It has already been a hot, dry summer, so we really need some rain.

  • Editor’s note: Sylvia Brockner was under the weather last week, so we’re reprinting a column that ran on Aug. 3, 1988.

    July has flown by with the speed of a hummingbird. August will, I fear, probably pass as swiftly. Would that there was some way to catch summer and hold it a little longer.

  • A friend volunteering at the Evergreen Nature Center last week asked me about an odd water mammal called a nutria. It seems that a volunteer on the boardwalk has pointed out a muskrat to a group of visitors, and this person came into the center and informed the volunteer on duty that “those animals out there are not muskrats; I grew up in Louisiana, and they are nutria. I have seen enough nutria that I know what they look like.”

  • How did it become the 4th of July already? Half the year is gone. Spring and the magical month of May are long gone, but just today I received a copy of the birds recorded at Evergreen Lake during May. It was compiled by Warren Roske from the list displayed on the lake bulletin board by Warren and several other regular visitors, especially Loie Evans, who rarely misses a morning bird walk around the lake.

  • It is sad to report that the song sparrow nest met with ill fate.

  • Robert Frost wrote, “Good fences make good neighbors.” In the case of artists Kevin Scofield and Christian Dore, good aspens make good neighbors. Or, inversely, good neighbors are brought together by good aspens. Most importantly, great art made by good neighbors looks even greater hanging on good aspens.

    Let’s start at the beginning. In 2001, photographer Kevin Scofield and his wife, Pam, relocated to Morrison. By day, Scofield is the news operations manager at Fox 31 Denver.

  • On a recent Sunday morning, Linda Zakes of Sundance Gardens phoned me to ask about a bird. I was flabbergasted when she told me it had built a nest in a pot of penstemon on one of the display tables in her nursery. I finished up the work I was doing and was on my way to Sundance Gardens filled with curiosity about which bird had built its nest in such an unusual place.

  • Summer weather is finally here, with all its outdoor activities. Hiking, birding, botanizing, camping, boating, swimming, climbing and exploring the backcountry are all part of summer’s pleasures. However, there are hazards in the outdoors that everyone should be aware of.

  • All during the long, cold spring, Community Weed Day is the day I have longed for.

    This is a “what is so rare as a day in June.” Sun, an intensely blue sky, white puffy clouds and a crisp gentle breeze have combined to make this a “perfect” day. A few widely scattered showers cooled off the afternoon, but now the sun is out, and everything is “bright and beautiful” again.

  • Editor’s note: Sylvia Brockner was a little under the weather last week, so we’re reprinting a column from June 1987. Sylvia reports that she’s feeling much better and that her column will return next week.

    My husband, Bill, and I have spent considerable time in our breeding bird atlas territory this past week.

    I fully expected to enjoy the time spent birding, but there is an additional dividend that I had not foreseen.

  • On Thursday morning, May 15, the birds at Evergreen Lake were awakened by the robust, rollicking song, “bob-o-link, bob-o-link, spink, spank, spink.” Words cannot do justice to the jubilant, bubbling sound of the bobolink. It is a loud explosion of exuberant joy, sung during migration and heard even more once they are on their breeding grounds. They sing on the wing, flying horizontally above the grasses in the fields where they nest.

  • One of the fondest memories of my childhood is that of the chipping sparrows that nested every year among the orange rose-like flowers of the vine that grew on a trellis between the window and the door to the cow barn. This location was subject to considerable traffic, as both people and farm equipment passed within a few feet of it frequently. The nest was about 5 feet up in the vine, just high enough that my mother had to lift me up to see the greenish-blue eggs with their purple-black markings.

  • I have received many inquiries lately about the Rocky Mountain pine beetle and whether or not I thought we were going to lose all our ponderosa pines, whether we should spray and with what, and, the real panic question, will we lose all our forests?

  • Spring is here, in all its glory. It is our most extravagant season. Each day spring flaunts something new to dazzle your eye, titillate your nose, send your spirits soaring and boggle your mind with splendor.

  • April is such a promising month. This year it has been an exceptional month, with very little snow and some truly summery weather. Many birds are streaming northward, and with the lake free of ice, waterfowl and shorebirds are arriving daily.

    Sunday, April 20, brought a broad-tailed hummingbird back to our yard and six white-faced glossy ibis to Evergreen Lake. Tuesday, April 22, brought the first chipping sparrow returning to our feeder. Wednesday, April 23, brought white-crowned sparrows, yellow-headed blackbirds and yellow-rumped warbles stopping on their way north.

  • Once more, fickle April had lulled us into believing spring had arrived with 80-degree temperatures, only to have our face slapped with soggy snow the next day.

    Tuesday, April 15, was unbelievably warm for the date, and its 80-degree temps brought two reports of broad-tailed hummingbirds. The first came from Inga Brennan on Lookout Mountain and the second from Sherman Wing in Indian Hills. On Wednesday, April 16, Rune and Trisha Toffte phoned to say they had a hummer at their feeder in Kittredge just before the big chill brought hummingbird activity to a standstill.

  • Last Wednesday was fairly warm and spring-like during the morning hours. However, as is so often the case, it foretold of snow to come.

    The lake has been slowly opening. An ever-widening inlet and a delicate curve of open shallow water along the north shore and between the inlet and the Lake House have made every day seem more spring like, even though it refroze every night. For a few nights now, it hasn’t frozen, so the warm days accomplished a bit more melt. This was enough to tip the Rotary club barrel into the lake, which made many people happy.

  • “Zeet, zeet, zeet, buzzy trill.” I stop to listen. Yes, it is the first song sparrow I’ve heard this spring! The three bright, clean starting notes, followed by a rapid jumble of short notes, is a loud announcement by a male song sparrow that he is claiming about an acre of local real estate as his nesting territory.

  • Some time ago, I mentioned the Eurasian collared dove, Streptopelia decaocto, and said it was becoming more common in Colorado. This beautiful dove has only recently become a part of the Colorado avifauna.

  • A few warm days this week have finally made it seem a bit like spring. There is a good bit of clear ground showing; only the deep drifts remain — a welcome change from all white. Although we are being promised more snow in a day or two, we at least know there is hope.

    I have a bouquet of daffodils on the living room table, from the supermarket gardens, but nevertheless they are bright sunshine yellow and sweet smelling. They give me hope that the daffodils in my yard will bloom someday soon.