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Features

  • Miss Rodeo America and Miss Rodeo Colorado sat side by side on the top of a restored fire truck Saturday, smiling and waving to the thousands of Rodeo Parade attendees lining downtown Evergreen.

    “See you at the rodeo!” said Miss Rodeo America Katherine Merck, who wore a white hat and a sash emblazoned with her prestigious title.

  • Not often do church services begin with an acoustic version of “Home on the Range,” but that was how United Methodist Church of Evergreen began its fourth annual Cowboy Sunday Service on Sunday.

    The event, which congregants say incorporates “Evergreen’s history and traditions,” is a unique service that includes Western- or cowboy-themed poetry, music and activities.

  • By Seth Bodine, for the Courier

    When 5-year-old Cooper Alapai of Conifer climbed onto a sheep for the second round of the mutton bustin’ event at the Evergreen Rodeo on Friday night, the announcer introduced him as a “real cowboy.” 

  • During World War II, it was common for households to place stars in their windows to represent how many family members were in the armed forces. And, if one of them died serving their country, the star would be replaced with a gold one.

    “There were six gold stars on my block in Kansas City,” American Legion member and World War II veteran Charles Purcell said on Memorial Day. “One for my next-door neighbor. One for an only child. One for my brother ... Today we celebrate those ‘gold stars.’ “

  • Morgan Wolfers’ picture of a spotted tiger moth and its pearl-like eggs is the kind of image you expect from a seasoned photographer: clean, micro-focused, incredibly detailed.

    But the image betrays both an illusion of size and years of experience.

    At 10 years old, the Conifer youth has accomplished what some photographers might only dream of: His work is on display at the Washington, D.C., home of Vice President Joe Biden.

  • Kai Bianco is finding his independence.

    The little boy, who was bitten in the head by the family dog when he was 9 months old, turned 3 on Tuesday. This fall, he starts preschool at Fletcher Miller School for children with special needs in Lakewood to get some additional physical and speech therapy, but his parents hope he will be at the same development level as his peers and ready to attend Wilmot Preschool in 2017.

    Kai went to a playground near his Evergreen home with his parents, Brandon Bianco and Shelby Foley, and they talked about his progress.

  • Editor’s note: The Canyon Courier is following three people hoping to complete the Evergreen Fire/Rescue academy to get their firefighting certification. This is the first in a series of stories about what it takes to become a firefighter.

    Imagine Evergreen Fire/Rescue personnel as being similar to pied pipers: They try to lead as many as possible down the path to become firefighters.

  • Astronomy enthusiasts and passers-by alike caught a rare glimpse of Mercury’s transit across the sun on May 9, the first time the phenomenon had occurred since 2006.

    “If you look about nine o’clock, there should be a clean black dot. The ones in the center are fuzzy sunspots,” said Mike Dempsey, a naturalist at Lookout Mountain Nature Center who was stationed at Mount Falcon Park with a $2,000 telescope donated by volunteers and equipped with a filter to make the viewing possible.

  • The Evergreen Masters Swim Team might be misnamed.

    While the team does hold swim practices twice weekly at Wulf Recreation Center, its mostly female members don’t limit themselves to the pool.

    “It’s not just swimming,” said member Kristine Stevens. “It’s a life experience.”

  • Among the oil paintings and equine photography at Main Street Fine Art and Shadow Mountain Gallery last Thursday were rows of boldly decorated duck-size ceramic eggs and their many egghead admirers.

  • After nearly 22 years at the helm of the Hiwan Homestead Museum, John Steinle is ending his career as the unofficial history spokesman for Evergreen and moving on to retirement and possibly a sideline as the author of a history book about Evergreen. His last day on the job will be April 29.

    Meghan Vickers, who has worked at the museum for 12 years, will continue as program coordinator. No replacement for Steinle had been named as of press time.

  • Call it a case of being in the right place at the right time — with the right training.

    In January, Doug Parce, a volunteer captain with Inter-Canyon Fire, was going through security at JFK International Airport in New York on a business trip to Europe when another passenger told a TSA agent that somebody wasn’t well.

    Parce saw the man, who was sitting on a bench where passengers put their shoes back on.

  • Yoga students are going to flip — literally and figuratively — over aerial yoga now being offered at Inspired Fitness.

    Called AIReal Yoga, the classes provide students with additional support as they negotiate the poses and stretches. Rebecca Kirschner, the owner of Inspired Fitness and an AIReal Yoga instructor, has been offering the classes for about a month, and she says they’re getting rave reviews.

  • DENVER — Delightful. Determined. Competitive. Funny.

    Those terms are used by the staff at Craig Hospital to describe Tom Babb, the Evergreen 19-year-old who was paralyzed in a freak accident while on a family vacation in Hawaii last December.

  • Leslie del Cueto of Indian Hills walked into the Evergreen Library to pick up some DVDs on March 25 and wandered into a gathering of the Friday Family Finders group of the Mountain Genealogists Society.  

    Del Cueto summoned the courage to ask them to help find three members of her immediate family, including a mother, half sister and half brother. She told the group she hadn’t seen or heard from them in 50 years, and that she had cancer and had a limited amount of time to say hello and then goodbye.

  • Evergreen Fire/Rescue keeps care packages with blankets and stuffed animals in its ambulances for children who are involved in accidents or fires.

    Now the fire department has 220 stuffed animals of all sizes, shapes and colors to put into the care packages — thanks to Wilmot Elementary fourth-grader Logan Gwaltney. Logan conducted a stuffed-animal drive to collect new or gently used toys last week at the school.

  • A coalition of religious and charitable groups is joining forces to provide overnight shelter for the homeless in the Evergreen area from October through April, beginning in the fall.

    Under the name SWEEPS — which stands for Severe Weather Emergency? Evergreen Provides Shelter — the program will operate only on nights when the temperature is forecast to be 20 degrees or lower. 

  • Who knew there were strategies to collect Easter eggs — especially when the hunt is in a pool.

    Four-year-old Caroline Heck tried the corner-and-scoop method to collect a bag full of plastic eggs at the Easter egg hunt at the Buchanan Rec Center pool on Friday, an event sponsored by the Evergreen Park and Recreation District. Caroline pushed some eggs toward a water feature in the pool and then grabbed them.

    While she liked all the colorful eggs, the pink ones were her favorite.

  • A short film shot in Evergreen last month brought cast and crew members from New York, Tennessee, Denver and New Zealand to town, and it’s hoped the drama about a mother and daughter facing their differences could put Evergreen on the map as a location for future films.

    “It has the possibility to put Evergreen in a spotlight that it hasn’t had before,” producer and Evergreen local Payton Dunham said. “Evergreen is a cool little town, but most people don’t know it’s up here.”

  • The 11th annual Mountain Area Home and Garden Show kicks off at the end of next month, bringing together as many as 110 providers and good and services with thousands of attendees.