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Today's Opinions

  • Overview of education reform proposal

    In my last column, I wrote about a soon-to-be introduced bipartisan bill called the Colorado Achievement Plan for Kids (or CAP4K). Since that time, legislation has been formally introduced in the state Senate and was assigned a bill number, SB 212.

    SB 212 is supported by Gov. Bill Ritter and enjoys bipartisan sponsorship in the Senate (Sen. Josh Penry, R-Grand Junction, and Sen. Chris Romer, D-Denver) and the House (Rep. Christine Scanlan, D-Summit County, and myself).

  • Are the U.S. elections rigged?

    Hannah Hayes

    There’s a longstanding trend to expand voting rights as demonstrated by these amendments — the 15th bans race-based voting qualifications, the 19th extends suffrage to women, and the 26th enfranchises 18-year-olds. Choosing our leaders is fundamental. An election decided by the Supreme Court is contrary to U.S. standards. The image of a team of hired protesters banging on Florida’s election room door to stop a hand count still bristles.

  • Killdeer at home on golf course

    Spring is finally here!

    We may still have a snowstorm or two, but today it is spring. When you live in the mountains of Colorado with their variable weather conditions, you learn to take the good days when they come, and today it is spring. Going out to fill the birdfeeders, I found yellow-green daffodil shoots poking up 3 inches out of the newly bare ground and pushkinia in bloom along the side of our stone wall.

    Spring is here — no doubt about it — and I am grateful.

  • Bipartisan education reform bill introduced

    As I wrote several weeks ago, I’ve been working with Gov. Bill Ritter and a bipartisan group of legislators to craft a rigorous education reform bill to prepare Colorado’s educational system for the challenges of a new global economy. That bill, called the Colorado Achievement Plan for Kids (or CAP4K), was formally introduced last week.

  • To err is human, to proofread divine

    Last week the Colorado Department of Transportation confronted a problem that is usually more closely associated with newspapers — the dreaded typo. Here in the world of print journalism, one of our biggest fears is that a rogue spelling will escape our attention and wind up in a monster-size headline on the front page.

  • What has 5 years at war cost us?

    Hannah Hayes

    It’s hard to wrap your mind around $720 million a day, and $500,000 per minute.

    After five years, the Iraq war is much more than a titanic financial burden. Civilian deaths are over 1 million, another challenging number, but these are lives, mostly of women and children. Iraq now has 5 million internally displaced people and refugees.

  • Legislative session reaches halfway mark

    The Colorado General Assembly passed the halfway mark of this year’s 120-session last weekend. This year’s session has been marked by big reports, the arrival of TABOR author Douglas Bruce and a workmanlike tone. The biggest issues are likely still to come.

  • Can't stop fires, but can make them a higher priority

    If you’ve been to Summit or Grand counties lately, you’ve seen the effects of the largest and most catastrophic pine beetle infestation in decades.

    As the Rocky Mountain News recently reported, “Every large, mature lodgepole pine forest in Colorado and southern Wyoming will be dead within three to five years,” based on projections from the U.S. Forest Service. The Rocky further reported that the outbreak, which began in 1996, has infested 1.5 million acres of trees, culminating in an unbelievable 500,000 additional acres in 2007 alone.