.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • Overreaching -- an immutable law of politics

    As in physics, politics has a handful of immutable laws. One of these is the Law of Overreaching, which states that the party in power will inevitably overreach.

    Majority parties tend to act as though the entire population shares their core agenda. The problem with this, of course, is that for the most part no majority is possible without the support of a sizable number of voters who aren’t affiliated with either party.

  • Spend more now on credit, get less later

    We’re all familiar with the endless solicitations for credit cards in the mailbox, but the most desperate one I ever received was an actual check for $100. All I had to do was endorse it and I’d get the cash — along with a new credit card. No strings attached, right?

  • Remembering days of Camelot

    By Hannah Hayes

  • A committed public servant

    After the assassination of Sen. Robert Kennedy in 1968, his brother Ted ended a moving eulogy by saying, “My brother need not be idealized, or enlarged in death beyond what he was in life; to be remembered simply as a good and decent man, who saw wrong and tried to right it, saw suffering and tried to heal it, saw war and tried to stop it. Those of us who loved him and who take him to his rest today pray that what he was to us and what he wished for others will someday come to pass for all the world.”

  • Curing an ailing health care system

    By Hannah Hayes

    After hearing the phrase “health care reform,” it’s sorely disappointing to see how shallow the thinking goes. All that’s being talked about is how to pay for exactly the same kind of health care that many Americans already have. The finances of medicine are in shambles, but true reform should go much further if the aim is to raise the quality of life.

  • Floundering cities: to rebuild or not

    By Hannah Hayes

    There’s a June 6 article in Forbes magazine called “The Best and Worst Cities for Recession Recovery.” Colorado has one city on the “best” list, Boulder, because of its technology industry and the university creating stable jobs. At the top of the “worst” list is Flint, Mich., with “the longest road to recovery.”

  • Lawmakers, listen up - it’s your job

    When I served in the legislature, there was a guy who e-mailed me often to remind me of what an idiot I was. He didn’t like the way I voted on a bill, and he let me know about it — again and again and again (most people don’t realize it, but Colorado state legislators don’t have a full-time staff, so when you’re e-mailing or calling your state representative or senator, the person taking the message is probably the legislator himself or herself).

  • A victory for open government

    Chalk up another victory for open government. The Board of Governors of Colorado State University has released the tapes of an obviously illegal executive session and paid the legal fees of newspapers in Fort Collins and Pueblo.