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Today's Opinions

  • Udall idea could help build unity

    I don’t always see eye to eye with U.S. Sen. Mark Udall, but I’ve never doubted his sincerity. Last week, he floated a simple but potentially revolutionary idea to change the partisan tenor of the annual State of the Union address. Rather than have Republicans and Democrats separated by party affiliation, Udall suggested, why not mix things up and let political adversaries sit next to one another?
    Senator Udall, that’s a terrific idea.

  • Our Readers Write

    Ignorance comes at a high price
    Editor:

  • A visionary path to seeing things clearly

    The demands on our eyes changed dramatically in the previous decade. Stress came from reading with backlighting online as opposed to reading books where light is reflected off the page. Talking with Dr. Marisa Kruger of Evergreen, I learned a lot about Vision Transformation, her behavioral optometry practice.

  • Legislature gets down to work

    Your Colorado legislature convenes today for the first regular session of the 68th General Assembly. Legislators will join new Gov. John Hickenlooper to do the public’s business and must complete their work by May 11 to comply with the 120 days voters have provided them to do their work.

  • Our Readers Write

    Thanks, Evergreen!
    Editor:
    As local chairman of the Evergreen Salvation Army Bell Ringing Campaign, I would like to thank all those people who so generously contributed of their time, energy and money to make the campaign a huge success in the Evergreen community.

  • Fiscal hurdles require cooperation

    The year 2011 is here, and with it comes a new slate. What’s past is past, and here’s hoping that our elected leaders both in Denver and Washington will seize the opportunity to put aside election year hostilities and work together for a greater good.

  • Our Readers Write

    Thanks for hosting Interfaith Thanksgiving

  • Bipartisan effort toes admirable line

    Democrats took control of the Colorado Senate by a narrow 18-17 margin after the 2000 election. Republicans maintained control of the House and the governor’s office. When incoming Senate President Stan Matsunaka spoke at the annual pre-legislative forum sponsored by the Colorado Press Association that year, he announced that because he didn’t believe a split legislature could agree on a plan, the Senate wouldn’t try to pass a bill to establish congressional districts for the next 10 years and the issue would be passed onto the courts.