.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • Legislature gets down to work

    Your Colorado legislature convenes today for the first regular session of the 68th General Assembly. Legislators will join new Gov. John Hickenlooper to do the public’s business and must complete their work by May 11 to comply with the 120 days voters have provided them to do their work.

  • Our Readers Write

    Thanks, Evergreen!
    Editor:
    As local chairman of the Evergreen Salvation Army Bell Ringing Campaign, I would like to thank all those people who so generously contributed of their time, energy and money to make the campaign a huge success in the Evergreen community.

  • Fiscal hurdles require cooperation

    The year 2011 is here, and with it comes a new slate. What’s past is past, and here’s hoping that our elected leaders both in Denver and Washington will seize the opportunity to put aside election year hostilities and work together for a greater good.

  • Our Readers Write

    Thanks for hosting Interfaith Thanksgiving

  • Bipartisan effort toes admirable line

    Democrats took control of the Colorado Senate by a narrow 18-17 margin after the 2000 election. Republicans maintained control of the House and the governor’s office. When incoming Senate President Stan Matsunaka spoke at the annual pre-legislative forum sponsored by the Colorado Press Association that year, he announced that because he didn’t believe a split legislature could agree on a plan, the Senate wouldn’t try to pass a bill to establish congressional districts for the next 10 years and the issue would be passed onto the courts.

  • A little style can be worthwhile

    Even more beauty is coming to our mountain community. Visual merchandiser Leezl Gnatovich will be opening a new store in the new year. Her aim is to create a rich sensory experience that will invigorate your shopping. There will be a touch of nostalgia thrown in.

  • Government transparency not negotiable

    Recently I was reading a book to my kids about the Philadelphia Constitutional Convention in 1787 when a remarkable fact jumped out: The delegates conducted their work in absolute secrecy. This was one of the only ground rules of the convention, and not until James Madison’s death in 1840 did his notes reveal the content of many discussions that took place.
    It’s very possible the Constitution — and this nation itself — would not exist as we know it had the deliberations been subject to public scrutiny.

  • No, Virginia, there is no transparency in Jeffco

    “This is a quarter of a billion dollars in stimulus we can’t pass up,” exalted County Commissioner Kevin McCasky in a story last week. “It’s going to be a great Christmas.”
    Commissioner McCasky clearly has caught the holiday spirit and envisions a joyous Noel at the Taj Mahal. In fact, he’s even provided the snow job.