Today's Opinions

  • Election-year session long on wrangling

    The 17th session of the Colorado General Assembly adjourned last week after a session that was long on partisan wrangling and relatively short on meaningful public policy achievements. As could have been expected in an election-year session when Democrats controlled the House by a 34-31 margin and Republicans had an 18-17 edge in the Senate, most bills that pursued a partisan agenda did not pass.


    We should cherish Evergreen’s natural beauty


  • Two lifesaving acronyms: CPR, AED

    A half century ago in rural Pennsylvania, a woman named Clem spent her mornings immersed in the pungent smell of chlorine and the ornery noise of youngsters wakened too early.

    Part drill instructor and part den mother, Clem preached water safety with the fervor of a country minister, and over the years she taught thousands of young charges how to swim. For the older students, the ones earning their lifeguard certification, this also meant a course in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.


    Make your voice heard in EPRD election


  • Character should be key in education

    In the 1980s, futurist John Naisbitt coined the term “high tech/high touch.”

    “The more technology we introduce into society,” he wrote, “the more people will aggregate, will want to be with other people.”

    While some predicted technologies such as home entertainment would mark the end of the movie theater, Naisbitt astutely observed that people don’t go to theaters to see movies per se; we go there to see movies with other people.

  • An important lesson on the road of life

    By John Newkirk

    As a boy I used to pass time on the school bus by counting street signs bearing names of classmates or family friends: Norman Lane. Willa Way. Lemasters Drive. Julie Lane. Granzella Road. Herzman Drive. What a novelty, I thought, to live in a community where roads are named after residents who are still living.

  • Our history told in the headlines of the day

    As journalists, the stories we tell are often referred to as the first draft of history. Others have said that we put the headlines on history as it happens.

    As an editor over the past 37 years, I have written somewhere around 150,000 headlines — a few clever, others disturbing, some so heartbreaking that they live still in my nightmares.


    Shelves seem emptier at Evergreen Library


    I just came back from the Evergreen Library, where I picked up two books I had requested. I find that I have to request books more often, as the library shelves are becoming more empty as days go by.