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Today's Opinions

  • Saving our wetlands: A tale of the Easter Duck

    By Bob Snyder
    The grandkids were asleep on Easter eve. Maggie (our Lab) and I plotted foolproof egg hunting. It’s no fun to hide easy ones, but we had to improve last year’s results of only 27 of 48. Knowing Maggie loves peanut butter and her nose is much better than my eyes and memory combined, I thought with a little on each egg, she could find them all.

  • Our Readers Write

    The Dykeman family says thanks
    Editor:

  • Feeding wildlife is harmful, illegal

    Colorado Parks and Wildlife officials are reminding the public about the negative consequences of feeding wildlife. The agency cautions that, in addition to being harmful for the health of wild animals, it is illegal to feed deer, bighorn sheep, mountain goats, pronghorn, bears and elk in Colorado.
    Wildlife belongs to the public, and officials encourage everyone to be responsible and avoid feeding, harassing or approaching any wild animal. Violators could receive fines from communities where feeding violates local ordinances, or from wildlife officers enforcing state laws.

  • The illusion of safety (and its risks)

    Most Americans over the age of 40 grew up with an omnipresent fear of nuclear war. Fear might be too weak a word — terror is more like it.

  • Walsh brought stability to EHS

    When members of Evergreen High School’s senior class arrived for school in August 2008, new principal Matt Walsh greeted them. He was the fourth principal in four years at EHS. Their freshman class principal retired at year-end. Their sophomore class principal, despite prior successes and high expectations, was not a good fit and lasted just one year. Their junior class principal was a retired administrator who stayed one year in an interim capacity.

  • Our Readers Write

    Thanks to volunteer firefighters for quick response in saving chicken coop
    Editor:
    We are so grateful to our volunteer fire department. Our chicken house caught fire, and when we noticed smoke, we called them. At the same time, two volunteer firefighters saw the smoke from the highway and arrived immediately. Within a few minutes, multiple fire trucks and many volunteers arrived on the scene.

  • Explaining votes on gun safety bills

    By state Sen. Jeanne Nicholson

  • Our Readers Write

    Volunteers want a fire board that will support their sacrifices
    Editor:
    What do the volunteer firefighters want?
    I have personally been asked this question by countless Evergreen citizens who know my involvement against the recall. For those that know me personally, you know I am passionate about safety and training.
    Our volunteers spend more than 10,000 hours per year training. This training building will provide: