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Columns

  • Five commissioners makes sense

    Jefferson County, with a population of approximately 550,000 people, is Colorado’s fourth largest county. A three-member Board of County Commissioners, who are elected at large, governs it. Large portions of the more densely populated areas of the county exist in unincorporated areas that receive urban services directly from county government.

  • Details on pet licensing in Jefferson County

    Residents of unincorporated Jefferson County have been required to license their dogs since 1994. In 2007, Lakewood, Golden, Wheat Ridge, Westminster and Arvada joined the county’s licensing program, and residents in those cities have been required to license their canines ever since.

  • Start fixing, just like Evergreen

    By Jim Rohrer

    So the beat goes on in Washington. Lawmakers and the White House continue to haggle. Now the main topic is the health-care website, but that’s just the latest thing to demonstrate that no one is thinking solutions. It seems more fun to bash the other party and blame them for all of what’s wrong.

  • Make your voice heard in school board election

    Here we go again! There are three seats up for grabs on the Jefferson County Board of Education, and as was the case two years ago when the other two seats on the board were filled, no incumbents are running for re-election. And as also was the case the last time we elected school board members in Jefferson County, there are stark differences between the candidates.

  • Tax measures on ballot merit yes vote

    Colorado voters are faced with two tax questions on this November’s ballot. One will impose sales and excise taxes on our newly legalized recreational marijuana industry, and the other will increase our state income tax to provide additional revenues for preschool through 12th-grade education. They both deserve our support.

  • Congress needs to hear citizens’ voices

    Is there anyone who is not fed up with Congress? We have a government shutdown, and a more serious crisis looms if Congress doesn’t come to some agreement about extending the debt limit.

  • The best of us, the worst of us

    In the wake of the catastrophic destruction and loss of property and life caused by the floods that ravaged our state earlier this month, many things come to mind. It reminds us of several things, including the ominous power of nature, our capacity to endure difficult situations, and how the inherent good and evil of people to either reach out and help those in need or to take advantage of a terrible situation show that disasters bring out both the best and the worst in people.

  • Time to support local businesses

    By Judy Johnson Berna

  • On Syria, I’ll trust the experts

    When Syrian President Bashar al-Assad used chemical weapons on his country’s citizens, killing more than 1,400 people, including defenseless children, he crossed a line for most Americans. While there is still much consternation over whether a military response is appropriate and, if so, how we limit our exposure and don’t get sucked into another seemingly endless intervention, there seems to be some consensus that the act of gassing innocents in Syria deserves a response.

  • InBloom concerns need attention

    By Paula Noonan
    Jeffco schools Superintendent Cindy Stevenson is traveling across the county to discuss various Jeffco education initiatives. One program, a large information technology pilot project called inBloom, will collect, store and distribute personal student data on off-site Amazon “cloud” servers managed by non-district employees.
    Information will include, at least, student ID number, name, address, test scores, demographic information, grades, assessments and some medical  information.