.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Annual bluegrass festival brings music lovers to Evergreen

    Offer it and they’ll come.

    The third annual Evergreen Bluegrass Festival on Saturday was a toe-tapping good time with around 2,000 people from the foothills and beyond attending the event at the Evergreen Rodeo grounds.

    Along with newcomers who had never attended before, the grounds were filled with bluegrass groupies who visit festivals such as Evergreen’s throughout the state. There’s one nearly every weekend from May through the beginning of September.

  • RMAE board ponders its gifted and talented education

    Rocky Mountain Academy of Evergreen plans to work this year on providing teachers with more support to develop plans that will better meet the needs of the school’s gifted and talented students.

    This goal is the first step in the board of directors’ plan to find ways to let parents know about their gifted and talented programming, and the board is beginning to consider whether it could offer a full-fledged GT program.

  • 16-year-old killed in U.S. 285 rollover crash

    A 16-year-old boy has died after his vehicle flipped over on northbound U.S. 285 late Wednesday night.
    While on routine patrol around 10:20 p.m., an officer with the Morrison Police Department spotted the single-car rollover accident.
    The officer pulled over to help and found that the 16-year-old juvenile driver, who hasn't been identified, was ejected from the car. The driver was pronounced dead on scene.

  • Sheriff's Calls

    Summer lovin’

  • CU professor calls total solar eclipse an experience like no other

    Doug Duncan has seen his fair share of total solar eclipses during his career as an astronomer, but for the University of Colorado professor and director of Boulder’s Fiske Planetarium, the eclipse next week will be the closest one to hit near home.
    “This is total eclipse No. 10 for me,” Duncan said. “I’ve seen them in China, South Africa, Bolivia, (the) Galapagos (Islands) and Mexico. Those are ones that come to mind.”

  • Opening of a new school year

    Dr. Brenda Krage, Platte Canyon School District

    For teachers, principals and school staff, August is a busy time of year. It’s also exciting as we prepare to open a new school year. At Platte Canyon School District, the floors are polished, the buses have been serviced, teachers have ordered their supplies and technology is ready to go. We are ready to welcome all of our students and families to the 2017-18 school year.

  • Investing in our children — immigrants and all

    The most important renewable resource that we can access is children. Our ability to provide education and training for future generations is the single biggest thing we can do to adequately prepare ourselves for the future.

  • School year brings about change, hope

    Tomorrow — Thursday, Aug. 17, as you read this — is the first day of school in Jefferson County, and my wife and I know it all too well. Goodbye, sleeping in until the weekend comes.
    OK, it’s not that bad. I don’t get that much sleep as it is. But with two school-aged children — one still in elementary school and another a year away from high school (gulp!) — the next nine months will be an assortment of running around to get kids to and from where they need to be, juggling homework assignments and finding that work-life balance.

  • Probable cause found in Joiner case

    A district judge last Thursday found probable cause in the case of a former Morrison police officer arrested in connection with theft, attempt to influence a public servant, embezzlement and forgery.

    Anthony Joiner, 38, is accused of stealing more than $132,000 from the Town of Morrison between December 2010 and February 2016.

  • Dragonfest forms family from those of different faiths

    For more than 30 years, people of all ages have gathered in the mountains of Colorado for a celebration of Earth-based spiritualities.

    This year – on a secluded plot of private land outside of Bailey – approximately 350 people united for a multi-day spiritual retreat called Dragonfest. Camping in tents side by side, attendees shared stories, created art and learned together.

    Many arrive at the festival as strangers, but by the time it’s over, most agree they’re more like family.