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Today's News

  • Charting a new course

    Conifer’s boys swim team is hoping to reach the next level.

    They were on the cusp of a top-five finish at last year’s Class 4A state tournament, taking eighth-place.

    This year the primary goal for the Lobos is simple.

  • Kids, commuters affected by storm

    Whether the two-day snowstorm that dropped more than a half-foot of winter across the mountain area on March 16 and 17 constituted a bane or a boon is a matter of perspective.

  • King-Murphy launching IB program

    Already one of the highest-performing primary schools in the state, King-Murphy Elementary School is shooting for the world.

  • Mountain real estate a buyer's game

    After treading water in 2006, the Evergreen real estate market showed some signs of recovery in 2007, but the modest increase in average selling price was offset by the fact that houses are taking longer to sell and the number of houses sold is declining.

    Realtors agree the current Evergreen area market from Bergen Park to Conifer is a buyer’s market, meaning interests rates are attractive and there are deals to be had. On the seller’s side, prices aren’t setting records, but they aren’t declining much, either.

  • Psychic fair materializes in Morrison

    With sidewalks covered in hoary frost and streets coated with several layers of mean slush, Morrison roads saw only the very brave or senseless the morning of Sunday, March 2.

    It didn’t take a rocket scientist to realize it was a better day to stay inside watching reruns of “Magnum P.I.” than to venture out on those dangerous roads to explore mysteries of an entirely different kind.

  • Evergreen office supply store D&J closing doors

    Evergreen’s small businesses are about to lose an important resource and, worse, an old friend.

    After 15 years providing efficient and personalized service from her Evergreen North Shopping Center storefront, D&J Office Supply owner Lori Mason is folding up her tent and moving on. To understand why, one need only look to the usual suspects.

  • Legislative session reaches halfway mark

    The Colorado General Assembly passed the halfway mark of this year’s 120-session last weekend. This year’s session has been marked by big reports, the arrival of TABOR author Douglas Bruce and a workmanlike tone. The biggest issues are likely still to come.

  • The tale of the screech owl

    Early spring is one of the best times to listen for owls. I have written in the past about some of our small owls but not for some time about the little screech owl. Screech owls are most commonly found along stream courses where they nest in old cavities in large cottonwoods and willows. They measure about 8 inches in height, which is only about the size of a robin, but, like all owls, they sit more upright and have fluffy feathers that make them appear larger.

  • Can't stop fires, but can make them a higher priority

    If you’ve been to Summit or Grand counties lately, you’ve seen the effects of the largest and most catastrophic pine beetle infestation in decades.

    As the Rocky Mountain News recently reported, “Every large, mature lodgepole pine forest in Colorado and southern Wyoming will be dead within three to five years,” based on projections from the U.S. Forest Service. The Rocky further reported that the outbreak, which began in 1996, has infested 1.5 million acres of trees, culminating in an unbelievable 500,000 additional acres in 2007 alone.

  • Rock of Ages

    Venerable hymns like “Michael, Row the Boat Ashore” and “Bringing in the Sheaves” are fine in their own quaint, antebellum way, but many of today’s younger set get more spiritual kick from the pop charts.