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Today's News

  • Romanoff has a full plate during his last two weeks

    Term-limited House Speaker Andrew Romanoff is attempting to address conflicts in our state constitution during his last two weeks of active legislative service. If he is successful, it will cap discussions he began five years ago.

    Romanoff became the House minority leader in 2003 when Sen. Doug Linkhart resigned after being elected to the Denver City Council. Jennifer Veiga left her post as House Democratic leader and replaced Linkhart. As dominoes continued to fall, Romanoff assumed Veiga’s leadership position.

  • I, tourist: disharmony in land of the Anasazi

    I find myself in desert country. Not too deep, but right smack dab in the middle of where I want to be. Miles and miles of asphalt passed under me to get here, washing cities to mountains, dirt to snow and back again. The thick, full Rockies went flat, disappeared for a time, then popped back up, red, sparse and skeletal. I’m in Moab, Utah. I stand in a land that once boasted an entire civilization that was rumored to have vanished almost overnight.

  • Review of 2008 legislature's work

    In less than three weeks, the 2008 legislative session will officially draw to a close. On all but a few key issues, its not too early to look back on the legislatures work and analyze what has been done good and bad.

  • Don't give hummingbirds what you wouldn't drink

    Once more, fickle April had lulled us into believing spring had arrived with 80-degree temperatures, only to have our face slapped with soggy snow the next day.

    Tuesday, April 15, was unbelievably warm for the date, and its 80-degree temps brought two reports of broad-tailed hummingbirds. The first came from Inga Brennan on Lookout Mountain and the second from Sherman Wing in Indian Hills. On Wednesday, April 16, Rune and Trisha Toffte phoned to say they had a hummer at their feeder in Kittredge just before the big chill brought hummingbird activity to a standstill.

  • Local, state, national races on '08 ballots

    In a year with heightened political activity nationally, it would be easy to overlook local issues, but residents ignore them at their peril. Local and regional ballot items from May through November range from district-level tax increases to the race to replace Republican Congressman Tom Tancredo.

    Jeffco Public Schools

    The Jeffco school district announced April 18 that it likely will seek a tax increase on the November ballot.

  • Puma kills two llamas in Morrison

    A Morrison family was disheartened to discover that their two prized llamas had been killed at their home April 12 by a mountain lion.

    The animals were nowhere in sight when Larry Cummings went to feed them early that morning in a pen about 400 feet from the family’s house. When he searched the property, he discovered they had been killed.

    “They were born and raised here, trained here, we showed them — they have just been wonderful animals,” Susan Cummings said Monday. “It’s just hard to get used to the idea that they are gone.”

  • EHS student fashions a future for Africa

    Katie Hutt wears her heart on her sleeve — and now you can too.

    Last January, the Evergreen High School sophomore launched Garden of Edith, a one-girl industry that gives people a chance to look good while doing good.

  • Rec center racquetball debate bounces back

    The topic of Evergreen racquetball is back in play, and at the Evergreen Park and Recreation board of directors meeting on April 15, competition was spirited.

  • The Natural: Earth Day dawns in Evergreen

    On Saturday, April 19, eco-centric folks from Crow Hill to Floyd Hill braved sunny skies, mild temperatures, gentle breezes and placid waters to celebrate Earth’s special Day in its most delightful setting.

  • Four vie for two seats on Indian Hills fire board

    On May 6, the good citizens of Indian Hills will cast their votes to fill a pair of impending vacancies on the Indian Hills Fire Protection District board of directors.

    The Indian Hills fire board oversees a district of about 12 square miles encompassing some 1,200 residents and protected by the 24-member, all-volunteer Indian Hills Fire and Rescue.