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Today's News

  • Turning up the heat in the polar bear debate

    Hannah Hayes

  • Bobolinks not popular with rice farmers

    On Thursday morning, May 15, the birds at Evergreen Lake were awakened by the robust, rollicking song, “bob-o-link, bob-o-link, spink, spank, spink.” Words cannot do justice to the jubilant, bubbling sound of the bobolink. It is a loud explosion of exuberant joy, sung during migration and heard even more once they are on their breeding grounds. They sing on the wing, flying horizontally above the grasses in the fields where they nest.

  • New Shanghai restaurant closes after 31 years

    New Shanghai restaurant, an Evergreen landmark for more than 30 years, closed its doors forever Saturday, May 24.

    Jim Lui became owner of New Shanghai in 2002 after he bought out his partner and brother-in-law, Bill Hsu, who moved to California.

    New Shanghai was known for its authentic Chinese, Japanese and Vietnamese cuisine and its homemade sauces.

    New Shanghai becomes the second longtime Evergreen eatery to close in recent months, a result of intensifying competition. Stroh’s Restaurant and Saloon downtown closed Feb. 24 after 26 years.

  • Forbes, Spinzig card top-10 finishes at state

    Evergreen girls golf coach Mike Kuzava felt like something was missing.

     

  • Cougars start summer season off with a bang

    Baseball is full of unique terms and acronyms such as the somewhat dubious PTBNL – player to be named later.

  • Property owners face off over Wah Keeney stagecoach road

    When Roseanne and Mike Paslay built their retirement home in an idyllic setting next to a creek at the end of a dirt road in Wah Keeney Park, they expected to spend their days quietly enjoying nature and clean air.

    Not so much.

    In September 2006, a year after they moved in, a builder showed up with truckloads of sand, dumped it on the side of the road in front of their house and left it there. The developer says it was 200 cubic yards. The Paslays said it was 20 to 30 truckloads.

  • New Shanghai restaurant closes after 31 years

    New Shanghai restaurant, an Evergreen landmark for more than 30 years, closed its doors forever Saturday, May 24.

    Jim Lui became owner of New Shanghai in 2002 after he bought out his partner and brother-in-law, Bill Hsu, who moved to California.

    New Shanghai was known for its authentic Chinese, Japanese and Vietnamese cuisine and its homemade sauces.

    New Shanghai becomes the second longtime Evergreen eatery to close in recent months, a result of intensifying competition. Stroh’s Restaurant and Saloon downtown closed Feb. 24 after 26 years.

  • Block party: Denver morning show wakes up at Evergreen Lake

    On May 22, local early-risers who tuned in to Fox 31’s popular morning show, “Good Day Colorado,” may have thought themselves still abed and dreaming. There on their screens, sandwiched between the usual campaign, crime and commerce reports, paraded a succession of their very own friends and neighbors, live and lively, against the familiar backdrop of Evergreen Lake.

    Truth is, it was a dream of sorts, a rare opportunity for Evergreen to toot its own horn for a statewide audience.

  • The real steel: Evergreen artist shows his metal

    No yard is so beautiful that it can’t be improved by a visit from some of the mountain area’s wilder residents. On the other hand, real elk can be murder on flowerbeds, real bear come with real teeth and real claws, and real wildlife of any kind can’t be relied upon to drop by when the in-laws are in town.

  • Jeffco team coordinating recovery efforts in Windsor

    Jefferson County’s Incident Management Team took control of the recovery efforts in Windsor in the wake of the devastating tornadoes of May 22.

    A statement was released announcing the team's control of the recovery efforts in the affected neighborhoods of Windsor and in the surrounding areas.

    At least one person died and more than 100 were treated for injuries when a series of twisters tore through northern Colorado.