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Today's News

  • Lobos get best of Cougars

    Conifer starting pitcher T.K. Ochoa couldn’t find the strike zone early on April 19.

    When the right-hander did hit his spots, the Cougars couldn’t find him.

  • County gives tentative OK to church expansion

    The Rock of Southwest Baptist Church came closer Tuesday morning to realizing its plan to add a two-story teen center building after a crucial vote of the Jefferson County Board of Commissioners. After two lengthy public hearings, two of three members of the board voted to endorse a version of the March 26 planning commission decision approving an expansion from 26,000 square feet to about 48,000 square feet of floor area. The church argued that it had the legal right to build up to 63,000 square feet.

  • Proposed cell tower concerns Bear Mountain residents

    A company wants to erect an 80-foot cellular tower near the summit of Bear Mountain if it can obtain a variance from the 35-foot height limit under current zoning regulations.

    The idea is to erect a “monopine,” a cell-phone tower that looks like a pine tree and is supposed to blend into the scenery.

    After considering the matter April 2 for about two hours, the Jefferson County Board of Adjustment voted to table the proposal indefinitely, while the county works on the telecommunications master plan.

  • Lobos double up Cougars

    LAKEWOOD – Had Evergreen erected a plate glass window in front of its goal April 17, Conifer’s Colleen Canty would have run through it.

    Had there been barbed wire coiled nearby, the sophomore striker would have hopped over it.

  • Is it the military's job to protect the environment?

    Hannah Hayes

    In Colorado there has been a fierce and sustained effort by the military to expand Fort Carson. Massive expansion through one of the military’s boldest land grabs would wipe out dinosaur prints, primitive cliff drawings, countless wildlife, local ranches and several small towns. The southeastern corner of our state must not be allowed to fall victim to the Army’s insatiable need to train in ever-wider landscapes.

  • Clean windows could mean an owl or two

    Last Wednesday was fairly warm and spring-like during the morning hours. However, as is so often the case, it foretold of snow to come.

    The lake has been slowly opening. An ever-widening inlet and a delicate curve of open shallow water along the north shore and between the inlet and the Lake House have made every day seem more spring like, even though it refroze every night. For a few nights now, it hasn’t frozen, so the warm days accomplished a bit more melt. This was enough to tip the Rotary club barrel into the lake, which made many people happy.

  • Local PFLAG contemplates a 15-year history of helping

    There’s no question that America’s lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender communities have achieved significant social and legal gains since the first formal meeting of Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays was held in New York more than 35 years ago. All the same, few would argue that significant antagonism toward non-traditional gender roles no longer exists.

  • Quail Forever takes flight in Colorado

    “The people asked, and He sent them quail ee”

    — Psalm 105:40

  • Easy Living magazine honors memory of Brad Bradberry

    Former Evergreen Newspapers publisher Brad Bradberry spent his last months on Earth working to launch a magazine for people suffering from the very disease that took his life. In recognition of Bradberry’s remarkable courage, optimism and generosity of spirit, the publishers of Easy Living Magazine have dedicated the latest issue of their glossy quarterly in his honor.

  • Runners carve out top times

    DENVER — It’s easy to get lost at an event the size of the Mullen Runners Roost.

    The Cougars did their best to stand out.