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Today's News

  • Lesson Plans: Country Day School offers full-tuition scholarships

    As you contemplate the school you’d like your children to attend in the fall, Evergreen Country Day School wants you to consider its program.

    The private school located near Wal-Mart has raised an additional $57,000 to provide tuition assistance to families. Tuition next year will be $11,500 per year for middle school, $11,000 for elementary school and $10,500 for kindergarteners.

  • Blue Spruce Closing its doors

     

  • Evergreen’s 150th celebrated in photo journey

    You’ll be hearing a lot about birthdays this year in the Evergreen area. On July 4, 1859, the Bergen family finished building their cabin in today’s Bergen Park, among the first settlers to put down roots in the area. In celebration of the 150th anniversary of this “founding” of Evergreen, John Steinle, administrator at the Hiwan Homestead Museum, has teamed with the Center for the Arts Evergreen.

    On Wednesday, March 25, Steinle will present a photo journey through Evergreen’s past via historic photos from the museum’s collection.

  • Blue Spruce closing its doors

    After three years, it’s “gut-wrenching” for Carol Miller to say goodbye to the business that became an extension of herself, Blue Spruce Market.

    “It just feels like a part of me is going away,” Miller said. “I don’t want to tell you that this has been easy. But it boiled down to we didn’t get the foot traffic. I don’t know what else I could have done to get people’s attention. The economy hasn’t helped.”

  • Teacher starts support group for parents of disabled kids

    More than a year ago, when teacher Lisa Arnold first moved to Colorado from Ohio, she felt she was alone.

    Before moving, she regularly attended a support group with other parents who had children with Down syndrome. Arnold and her daughter, Grace, had been part of the group since Grace was a baby almost nine years ago.

    But when the art teacher moved to Evergreen so she could teach art at Carlson and King-Murphy elementary schools, she found nothing to meet that need. So she decided to create a group of her own.

  • Local legislators divided on road improvements

    After several years of talk but no action, the legislature has approved SB 108, a transportation bill that will raise between $200 million and $250 million a year for three years, mainly through an increase in vehicle registration fees.

    SB 108 goes by the acronym FASTER, for Funding Advancement for Surface Transportation and Economic Recovery.

    The bill’s chief architect was Sen. Dan Gibbs, the Democratic senator who represents Jefferson and Clear Creek counties in Senate District 16.

  • Mountain lion buries deer in leaves on Pine Drive

    Wildlife officials responded to a report of a lion sighting in the 27900 block of Pine Drive near the Canyon Courier at 7 a.m. Wednesday, March 11.

    Another lion that killed a goat was later trapped and euthanized because it had lost two canine teeth and would have starved to death.

    In the first case, officers discovered the young female lion had killed a deer and buried it in a pile of branches.

  • A tale of two mountains

     

    A community umbrella group in Mount Vernon Canyon voted 13-1 on March 12 to make a unified statement against using Lookout Mountain as an alternative location for new broadcast towers.

    Some residents had been concerned that Canyon Area Residents for the Environment was using its influence to promote Lookout Mountain, which already has a supertower, as a location.

  • Indoor equestrian center up and running

    Andra Ozols wasn’t horsing around when she decided to build an indoor equestrian center in Indian Hills.

    The indoor facility, which opened in January, is 42,000 square feet — nearly an acre of enclosed arena, a 37-stall barn, changing rooms, a laundry room and other amenities. There’s also an outdoor riding arena, outdoor pastures and paddocks.

    Ozols wants it to be the premier hunter/jumper facility in the area.

  • It’s not the same old Evergreen Fine Art

    Art fans who enjoy room to move and space to breathe will love the revamped and revivified version of the Evergreen Fine Art Gallery. It’s the same building, but you’d swear it’s a different space, with the rooms rehung in a museum-style configuration. The walls seem broader, with more space between each work and several works by each artist grouped together. The gallery’s striking glass collection has been moved downstairs to the main level, and the gift area filled with designer and vintage jewelry, as well as small sculptural pieces, has been expanded.