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Today's News

  • County program would let more defendants make bail

    A new pretrial assessment program could make it possible for Jeffco judges to grant more defendants bail and dramatically reduce the population at the jail.

    The program would restructure the way judges make decisions on granting bail, which could reduce the jail population by up to 300 inmates per day, Tom Giacinti, the county's justice services director, told the county commissioners May 26.

  • Title run

    By the time Evergreen’s 4x400-meter boys relay team took to the track at Jeffco Stadium on May 16, they already had a school record in hand.

    They figured going for broke in the Class 4A state finals wasn’t a bad idea.

    So, that’s exactly what they did.

    Running care-free and loose, the team of Nat Prouty, Andrew Gysin, Jeff Troyano and Bryson Newhall shattered the school record they had just set 24 hours prior, burning up the track in a time of 3 minutes, 20.13 seconds to take home state gold with ease.

  • Flater still causing a racquet

    Winning never gets old. Roald Flater never seems to either.

    Flater, 83, took home his fifth gold ball May 10 following a three-set victory to win the U.S. National Indoor Championship’s 80-and-up division in Vancouver, Wash.

    “I was surprised,” the longtime Evergreen resident and member of the Colorado tennis hall of fame said. “Probably my best win I’ve ever had.”

    And that’s saying a lot for a man that has quietly been making a racquet around the country and world for decades.

  • Upper Bear spec home part of luxury tour

    A luxury timber-and-rock mountain home furnished by Evergreen designer Kay LaMontagne and built by Conifer custom-home builder Landmark Traditions is one of 27 luxury homes on the 2009 Denver Luxury Home Tour from June 5 to July 5.

    LaMontagne’s challenge was to fill the home with just the right amount of furniture.

  • The digital dark ages

    After 20 years of soaking up flawless free TV thanks to a rooftop antenna and line-of-sight to his house in Brook Forest Estates, Bill Bergan is understandably alarmed to watch his four screens fading slowly as television goes digital.

    For Bergan, the advent of so-called cutting-edge digital TV on the Front Range means a giant step backward. His four television sets could become useless furniture by June 12 unless he forks over $75 a month for Dish Network.

  • Chemical allergies force woman to live like homeless person

    After being forced out of her bug-sprayed house in Santa Fe, a woman has found her way back to Evergreen in a desperate quest to find a safe place to live.

    The woman, Julie Tambourine, is suing an exterminating company for spraying her house in New Mexico with pesticide in 2006 by mistake, after she had already lost her job as a flight attendant due to chemical exposure on international flights.

  • Lab mix attacks woman on Hiwan Drive

    A tan and white Labrador mix bit a Hiwan Hills woman five times on the backs of her legs and charged a couple of deputies before authorities could capture the dog and remove him from the scene.

    The woman was walking on the street by a home at 2957 Hiwan Drive about 2:30 p.m. Monday, May 18, when the dog attacked her, according to a Jefferson County deputy’s report.

    The injured woman told the Canyon Courier on May 26 she was recovering from her wounds and she expected to obtain some restitution for her medical bills.

  • Man has close encounter with coyotes

    A man walking in Alderfer-Three Sisters Park on May 13 was stunned to see a coyote attempt to lure his two dogs into what he thought was a three-against-two ambush.

    Sighting coyotes working in packs in the mountains is extremely unusual, said Jennifer Churchill, a spokeswoman for the state Division of Wildlife. Mostly they are solitary creatures, Churchill said.

    In the last six months, five people in the Denver area have reported being bitten by coyotes.

  • Passing the buck: Cervi Ranch has provided generations of gyrating beasts for the Evergreen Rodeo

    Sparse patches of brush and dry grass dot the nearly featureless horizon of Sterling, where a hint of the Old West remains untainted from decades of development and technological progression. It may not seem like the ideal place to find a modern, world-class athlete, but rodeo man Binion Cervi would disagree.

  • Jeffco teachers union at an impasse with district over pay

    The union representing Jeffco Public Schools' teachers has voted to declare an impasse in negotiations with the district over pay increases.

    "The major sticking point in the negotiations is the fact that while our workload has continued to increase, the district is not willing to add a cost-of-living adjustment to the salary schedule," JCEA president Kerrie Dallman said in a May 19 interview. "They prefer instead to give a one-time stipend."