Today's News

  • Real divide: libertarians vs. statists

    Sometimes I wonder whether we use the right nomenclature to describe the basic political divide in America. We see “liberals” on this side and “conservatives” on that side, with Democrats generally representing the former and Republicans the latter.

    But a compelling case can be made that the political landscape is really more sensibly divided into those who believe government should have a limited role (libertarians) and those who prefer government to have a more active role (statists). 

  • A matter of becoming the gift outright

    I am now a permanent resident and registered alien after 10 years of struggle. The alien part notwithstanding, to a poet like me, this is like saying, a bird authorized to sing, a dog authorized to bark, and a mother to suckle her young.

    Andrei Guruianu, a Romanian immigrant poet, said this about his poem, “Alien Authorized To Work”:

  • Improv troupe brings epic laughs to Evergreen

    Ever wonder why Thanksgiving dinner with the family can be so hilarious — or stressful? Bring together disparate personalities with all of their eccentricities. Add a dash of conversation. Throw in a controversial topic or two, and you have the makings of a family feast failure — or farce, depending on how you look at it. Now imagine that you’ve selected the diners yourself. Replace crazy Aunt Margaret with an astronaut who has a nervous tick or Grandpa Joe with a go-go dancer who wants to be the president. Now you have the makings of an Epic evening.

  • Cultural district debuts special deal for King Tut

    The sponsors of the Tutankhamun exhibit at the Denver Art Museum are offering a special ticket deal to members of the Scientific and Cultural Facilities District, which includes Jefferson and six other counties.

    During September SCFD residents will be eligible to receive one free youth (age 6 to 17) ticket for every adult or senior ticket purchased, as a thank-you gift to cultural district members for their support for more than 20 years.

  • A camera here, a camera there

    At what point will we finally have enough surveillance cameras? It’s hard to go anywhere without being watched by at least one, and often several, closed-circuit eyes in the sky. On a typical five-minute walk in downtown Denver, you don’t have to look very hard to find 20 or more cameras. They’re on lampposts, the sides of buildings, on ceilings, atop traffic lights and along walls.

  • Center for the Arts pays tribute to teachers

    The school buses are groaning to life, pencils are sharpened and the halls are filled with students. School’s back in session. Students are gearing up for another year of camaraderie and creative thought. But why should the kids have all the fun? The Center for the Arts Evergreen is gearing up for its own “school year,” and is kicking off September with a tribute to teachers.

    Friday, Sept. 3, marks the opening of the Center for the Arts Evergreen Teachers Show.

  • Cody Park subdivision creates fire escape route

    The knowledge that there is only one way in and out of your neighborhood — which is rated at high risk for wildfire — can give some folks the whim-whams.

    Such was the daily fear faced by residents of the Cody Park subdivision until they figured out how to create an escape route — with a lot of sweat equity and virtually no money.

    Foothills Fire Chief John Kilpatrick came up with the of idea of using the right of eminent domain, a legal principle that allows the fire agency to effectively take control of private property in an emergency.

  • Governor candidates collide in three-way debate

    Three candidates for governor faced off in the first televised, three-way debate leading up to the Nov. 2 election, and the question of the day turned out to be whether or not Republican Dan Maes of Evergreen would stay in the race after several important Republican supporters such as Hank Brown, John Andrews, among others, had called for his immediate exit.

    In the two weeks leading up to the debate, Maes had been the subject of front-page articles questioning his honesty and trustworthiness.

    As expected, Maes did not back down under the pressure.

  • Ex-Bronco Van Heusen focused on new business

    Billy Van Heusen will tell you that he liked Denver so much that he never left. The former Denver Broncos split end and punter has made the Mile High region his home, even now some 33 years after his playing days ended.

  • Evergreen boys, girls open year in 4th, 6th

    AURORA — Bryn Haebe, as honest as she could be, admitted that the cross country course at Arapahoe County Fairgrounds was a bit boring. There are no shades, no trees. It makes for a great course for the spectators looking on, but not so much for the runners participating.