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Today's News

  • Private tennis club to go public Feb. 21

    The private tennis club that has operated in the tennis bubbles for 20 years will become the Evergreen Sports Center public tennis center as of Feb. 21, under the ownership of real estate investor Brett Champine.

    Last year, Champine abandoned his plan to take down the tennis bubbles and build an Office Depot and small retail center on the Lewis Ridge property.

  • Chorale offers an evening with Andrew Lloyd Webber

    Each spring the Evergreen Chorale stages its annual musical, but this year the Chorale is trying a new format: Rather than one staged musical, the Chorale will feature musical excerpts from 10 of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s most famous shows. The songs will be staged with costumes and choreography so the audience gets the best and brightest from Lloyd Webber’s signature works.

  • Team learns about construction, careers in competition

    Armed with boxes, tools, duct tape and schematic drawings, members of team 4Ever Green competed in the Construction Challenge on Feb. 7 in Aurora.

    The team — consisting of seven Evergreen Middle School students — placed third all-around in the statewide competition, which teaches middle school and high school students about designing and building. The team took first place in the infrastructure challenge.

  • Colorado Children’s Theater is best acting group at Atlanta festival

    Evergreen and Conifer were well represented at Music Theater International’s 2009 Junior Theater Festival in Atlanta.

    Out of 34 children’s theater schools nationwide, members of Evergreen’s Colorado Children’s Theater took home the award for best acting group, and one member of the theater, Chapman Hyatt, 14, took home the award for best actor.

    More than 1,400 kids and their theater teachers gathered for a weekend in January to show off their acting skills and learn new ones at workshops with professionals.

  • Shop locally to preserve Evergreen businesses

    Each of us has our own reasons for living in the Evergreen area. The beauty of mountain living, the solitude of being nestled in the pines and our close proximity to Denver are all appealing attributes.

    With my longevity in the community of close to 30 years, I’ve earned the honored title of “local.” As with most “locals” you know, I am very protective, loyal and adamant about preserving everything that is special about our community.

  • School district facing tough choices

    When Jefferson County voters  rejected Amendment 3A last November, it forced school officials to work in earnest on spending plans they’d begun discussing before the election. After implementing spending increases that are already planned, it has been estimated that $35 million will need to be found over the next three years.

  • What’s in a word?Plenty, if you think about it

    In his terrific essay on “Politics and the English Language,” George Orwell observed that “(w)hen there is a gap between one’s real and one’s declared aims, one turns as it were instinctively to long words and exhausted idioms, like a cuttlefish spurting out ink.”

    Orwell spoke of a phenomenon that exists in our time as it did in his — the hijacking of language to conceal the truth behind political objectives.

  • Two plays deliver with substance on stage

    In today’s media, we are constantly bombarded with red-carpet shots of celebrities arriving for world premieres. Oftentimes, the pomp and circumstance are greater than the quality of the show contained within.

    In the case of the Denver Center Theater Company, the reverse is true. January is New Play Month at the Denver Center, and two new works for the stage, “Inana” and “Dusty and Big Bad World,” have premiered in recent weeks. What they lack in spectacle outside the theater, they more than make up for in substance on stage.

  • Young artists stage a merry go-round at RMAE

    Amber Lichfield has the gentle manner and animated expressions that would make any preschooler feel welcome in her classroom. She is not, however, a preschool teacher. Lichfield is a middle school math teacher at Rocky Mountain Academy of Evergreen — and an artist.

  • Tradition sets well at Hi-Winder salon

    Connie Offermann’s customers have a routine: shampoo, set, repeat. Every week, they return to have it all done again, though a haircut is occasionally thrown into the mix. And that’s the way it’s been for 40 years. Offermann, who opened Evergreen’s Hi-Winder Beauty & Barber Salon in January 1969, admits that people are what got her into the hair business. Though she likes making customers look their best, she finds a greater reward in the friendships that bloomed from weekly styles and trims. “They’re like my family,” Offermann said.