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Today's News

  • Teacher starts support group for parents of disabled kids

    More than a year ago, when teacher Lisa Arnold first moved to Colorado from Ohio, she felt she was alone.

    Before moving, she regularly attended a support group with other parents who had children with Down syndrome. Arnold and her daughter, Grace, had been part of the group since Grace was a baby almost nine years ago.

    But when the art teacher moved to Evergreen so she could teach art at Carlson and King-Murphy elementary schools, she found nothing to meet that need. So she decided to create a group of her own.

  • Local legislators divided on road improvements

    After several years of talk but no action, the legislature has approved SB 108, a transportation bill that will raise between $200 million and $250 million a year for three years, mainly through an increase in vehicle registration fees.

    SB 108 goes by the acronym FASTER, for Funding Advancement for Surface Transportation and Economic Recovery.

    The bill’s chief architect was Sen. Dan Gibbs, the Democratic senator who represents Jefferson and Clear Creek counties in Senate District 16.

  • Mountain lion buries deer in leaves on Pine Drive

    Wildlife officials responded to a report of a lion sighting in the 27900 block of Pine Drive near the Canyon Courier at 7 a.m. Wednesday, March 11.

    Another lion that killed a goat was later trapped and euthanized because it had lost two canine teeth and would have starved to death.

    In the first case, officers discovered the young female lion had killed a deer and buried it in a pile of branches.

  • A tale of two mountains

     

    A community umbrella group in Mount Vernon Canyon voted 13-1 on March 12 to make a unified statement against using Lookout Mountain as an alternative location for new broadcast towers.

    Some residents had been concerned that Canyon Area Residents for the Environment was using its influence to promote Lookout Mountain, which already has a supertower, as a location.

  • Indoor equestrian center up and running

    Andra Ozols wasn’t horsing around when she decided to build an indoor equestrian center in Indian Hills.

    The indoor facility, which opened in January, is 42,000 square feet — nearly an acre of enclosed arena, a 37-stall barn, changing rooms, a laundry room and other amenities. There’s also an outdoor riding arena, outdoor pastures and paddocks.

    Ozols wants it to be the premier hunter/jumper facility in the area.

  • It’s not the same old Evergreen Fine Art

    Art fans who enjoy room to move and space to breathe will love the revamped and revivified version of the Evergreen Fine Art Gallery. It’s the same building, but you’d swear it’s a different space, with the rooms rehung in a museum-style configuration. The walls seem broader, with more space between each work and several works by each artist grouped together. The gallery’s striking glass collection has been moved downstairs to the main level, and the gift area filled with designer and vintage jewelry, as well as small sculptural pieces, has been expanded.

  • In tough times, newspaper and readers can help each other

    We’ve been hearing every day for months now about the bad economy. Every night we go home to the news of more layoffs and cutbacks. We have all been impacted in some way. I know the Courier has. We have reduced staffing through attrition; as employees have resigned for different opportunities, we have restructured and asked our current employees to take on additional duties.

  • Our future: the journalism of hope

    “For suddenly he was thinking … that if he was not a writer, he was not real, that he did not exist.”

    — Robert Penn Warren, in “Flood”

    As Coloradans listen to the echoes of a great voice gone suddenly silent, the words of Robert Penn Warren ring quietly and persistently for me in the void.

  • Spring bird box sale pays lasting rewards

    The robin that Loie found in my yard during the Great Backyard Bird Count on Feb. 14 was most likely not a returning spring robin. It was one of several that usually winter in the area. There were 30 American robins reported on the Christmas Bird Count last December.

  • Bennet says $900 million in stimulus funds will prevent school layoffs

    U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet says that $900 million in federal stimulus money headed to Colorado for educational purposes will prevent layoffs at school districts statewide, but Jeffco Public Schools officials say they aren’t so sure.

    Bennet said the federal government is doling out $44 billion in stimulus funding that will be available to state education budgets in 30 to 45 days.