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Today's News

  • Teens use henna for their body of work

    Creativity combined with henna dye for about 30 area teens, who learned the art of henna body painting last week.

    The youths attended a seminar July 1 at the Evergreen Library with henna artist Kandra Churchwell. Churchwell, who works professionally as a graphic artist, has learned to work with henna dye and spent an hour in the packed room helping girls and boys master the ancient art.

    In her 15-minute introductory lecture, Churchwell explained that henna body art is something that she and her family do for fun.

  • Longtime hospice director Walthers stepping down

    Louisa Walthers, who has served as executive director of Mount Evans Hospice and Home Health Care for the past 24 years, has announced plans to step down at the end of August.

    Walthers, 54, joined the agency as its second director 24 years ago, only five years after it was founded. At that time, Mount Evans had a $300,000 annual budget and served three counties out of a two-room office in the Evergreen North shopping center.

    Walthers will be leaving an agency with its own building, serving four mountain counties and operating on a $3 million budget.

  • Fireworks at the Little Bear: Couple marry a year later after chance meeting sparked romance

    On Independence Day 2008, Crystal Lovell and Peter Harnden met for the first time while occupying neighboring bar stools at the Little Bear.

    One year later, on July 4, 2009, they both gave up their independence — taking wedding vows at the very same spot.

    The local pair exchanged their vows in front of customers, friends and relatives in a nontraditional wedding with a “black sheep” theme.

    The bride wore tidy blue jeans, a black T-shirt and a turquoise necklace, with earrings to match.

  • Fresh and friendly: Two farmers markets bring adventurous offerings to Evergreen each week

    Both farmers markets in Evergreen offer a bountiful harvest of small pleasures: shopping outdoors, chatting with vendors, loading up on fresh asparagus, and discovering your neighbor got downsized and is now making ecologically correct detergent or toddler pants for a living.

    The Evergreen Farmer’s Market operates downtown on Mondays, and the Evergreen Farmers’ Market in the Bergen Village shopping center, which was originally founded in the parking lot of the El Rancho Walmart in 2000, is open on Tuesdays.

  • Mountain movie magic: Evergreen residents line up behind local indie producer

    It’s a story as old as romance: Stinging from a recent breakup, an ordinarily passive woman lets a more gonzo friend drag her to a local honky-tonk for a little re-immersion therapy. The beer runs cold, emotions run hot, the band is smokin’, and when she spies her one-time lover burning it up on the dance floor with his new flame, things heat up fast.

    Just another Saturday night in downtown Evergreen?

  • 'Goalie in the wheelchair' not defined by his limitations

    In Denver area ice hockey circles, he was known simply as “the goalie in the wheelchair.”

    Kyle Stubbs and his chair stopped pucks for a lot of teams over the years: the Warthogs, the Grinders, Berserk, Spitfire, and Chimney Full of Squirrels, to name a few. And he frustrated the shooters of other teams too numerous to list.

    On a recent Saturday, many of us who played with and against Kyle gathered at the Promenade in Westminster to say goodbye and to remember a man who refused to accept the limits that life imposed.

  • Saving birds from death from window strikes

    About five years ago I was reading about the thousands of migrating birds killed every year by flying into windows. I had been concerned about the many birds that hit my big picture windows every year and decided I should do something about it. The article I read also told about a college student who was doing research on the problem and mentioned that a black-plastic anti-deer fabric had the best results in his tests.

  • Gov. Ritter puts his principles before politics

    Cynics who believe that, when given a chance, politicians will take the politically expedient route were dealt a blow when Gov. Bill Ritter vetoed two priority bills of organized labor after the 2009 session of the Colorado General Assembly adjourned.

  • ‘Halfway to Heaven’ a perfect summer read

    Two years ago, I got a call from my friend Mark Obmascik. Mark, a former Denver Post reporter turned author, was working on a new book, and he needed help.

    His previous book, called “The Big Year,” was about hard-core birders who tried to accumulate as many species sightings as they could in 365 days. It was quirky and entertaining, and compelling enough to get me into birding myself.

  • Peak Academy working for nonprofit status

    Peak Academy of Dance is becoming more than just a dance studio.

    The studio in Aspen Park is working to become a nonprofit that will be called Peak Performance Company, according to owner Danielle Heller.

    Working with local businesses and performers, Peak has raised enough money to fill out the necessary paperwork to file for 501(c)3 status from the Internal Revenue Service and is on its way to realizing its dream to offer dance scholarships and be a community-wide performance arts center.