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Today's News

  • Church wins approval for outdoor worship area

    The county commissioners have recommended approval of a special-use proposal for an outdoor amphitheater for about 200 on the grounds of First Baptist Church of Evergreen.

    The commissioners voted 3-0 to approve the plan on May 12.

    The fabric-roofed, open-air structure would be on land at the base of a hill near the church on Troutdale Scenic Drive. The county’s planning commissioners agreed to allow outdoor amplification after planning commissioner Larry Anna said he would prefer no sound system be allowed.  

  • EHS students become actors in fire safety film

    Fourteen theater students from Evergreen High School spent the past weekend working on a training film about landscaping homes to keep them safe from fire.

    The project is being sponsored by the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office, said Fran Arniotes, the school’s theater teacher.

  • Obamas' dog has relative in Evergreen

    In the 1930s, the number of Portuguese water dogs had declined to about 18. Today the count is closer to 10,000, Vanek said.

    “I was with the breed when nobody knew what it was,” said Vanek, who has lived in Evergreen for 30 years.

    Vanek, a dental hygienist, is an international AKC dog show judge and dog breed expert. She also does anesthesia-free canine teeth cleaning on a freelance basis.

  • Commissioners OK 48 acres for Lewis subdivision

    The county commissioners approved a 19-home addition to the Homestead subdivision off North Turkey Creek Road by a unanimous 3-0 vote April 28 at a regular board meeting.

    In connection with the 48-acre development, the Buffalo Park Development Co. is required to contribute $117,000 to partially pave the unpaved parts of Homesteader Drive. Lewis previously paid $29,000 for an earlier filing that also affects Homesteader Drive. The Jefferson County Road and Bridge Department will do the work.

  • Humphrey Museum rehires former executive director

    After shutting its doors for five months to regroup, the nonprofit Humphrey Museum reopened for business April 1 under the leadership of Bill Thinnes, who returns as executive director.

    Thinnes, who served as museum executive from 1995 until 2001, recently returned from the Western Slope and is thrilled to be back at the place he considers something of a second home. Thinnes began serving as executive director at Hazel Lou Humphrey’s request when she died in 1995 at age 78.

  • Stingers parents object to downsizing of GM job

    The board of the Stingers Soccer Club on May 6 faced a crowd of more than 100 parents, most of whom were unhappy about the board’s plan to save money by cutting the general manager’s position.

    The board of directors has proposed reducing general manager Ivan Jackson’s salary by 30 percent and making him one of three coaches operating under the supervision of the board.

  • Flu case closes Jeffco school

    A Jeffco Public Schools charter school in Arvada will be closed through May 8 after one of its students tested positive for the H1N1 flu.

    Lynn Setzer, spokeswoman for the district, said the student is expected to make a full recovery, but Excel Academy will be closed this week "as a precaution." The school's 450 students will work from home during the week.

    State health officials have confirmed four cases of H1N1 in Colorado, including two cases in Jeffco, with each patient expected to fully recover. The other Jeffco case was reported to be a man in his 20s.

  • Children’s Chorale brings Disney’s ‘Mulan’ to life

    The Evergreen Children’s Chorale is taking audiences back to the legendary days of ancient China. The ECC’s latest production of “Mulan, Jr.” brings the animated 1998 Disney movie to the stage. “Mulan” is a cultural cornucopia of traditional music, dance and storytelling that is a feast for the eyes and ears.

  • Finches bring springtime joy to Rockies

    The big snow has come and gone. It was not quite as much as we had a few years ago, but it was more than we needed at one time. I measured 3½ feet at our house, but it was so warm that much of it melted as it fell, and it weighed so much that it compacted what had already fallen. So, measurements were less than accurate. I decided that the actual depth didn’t much matter. After you pass 2 feet of wet heavy snow, most of the roads are closed and the damage to power lines has been done.

  • Echoes of past, hope for the future

    Journalists are captivated by anniversaries, and that’s one of our biggest failings. The tendency, after an arbitrary number of years, is to find morals and endings, to tie up the loose strings of a tragedy and pronounce the community ready to move on.