.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Squaw Mountain home of highest TV broadcast tower

     

    From its lofty perch on Squaw Mountain, KBDI Channel 12 has the distinction of having the highest TV broadcast tower in North America at 11,200 feet altitude.

    But if you don’t re-scan, you won’t see its signal.

    Colorado Public Television Channel 12 moved Friday, June 12, from UHF channel 38 to the new permanent VHF channel 13. It will still show up on the on-screen program guide as channel 12 under the new nationwide digital TV broadcast conversion that went into effect Friday.

  • June finally brings spring’s green hues

    June has finally brought spring to the mountains. Our Evergreen World is GREEN, as green as I have seen it since last August when the drought turned everything to a uniform tan. Even the ponderosa pine trees had lost their scintillating sparkle. Now, after nearly a month of rainy weather, they are sparkling in the sunshine. The hills are green with evergreen trees, kinnikinnick and grasses, and the valleys are green with the new growth of willows.

  • Fire board is careful regarding executive sessions

    Greg Romberg, in his opinion article in the May 27 Canyon Courier, is correct, and I appreciate his advice and cautions. Members of the Evergreen Fire Protection District board are continually reminded by our district counsel of the very narrow reasons we can go into executive session. Since it appears as if my comments were not clearly vocalized, I will try again.

  • Does Walmart contribute to poverty?

    By Hannah Hayes

    There was a time when you could market a product based on its inherent value. Lately, low price has become the predominant criteria in the marketplace. The world’s largest corporation, Walmart, shares mightily in the creation of that business ethic. The company is even benefiting during these tough economic times as it draws people in with low prices, while many say it’s Walmart that created the difficulties in the first place.

  • Terminal velocity

    MORRISON — If running up Mount Falcon makes someone crazy, then running down Mount Falcon makes you … um ... even crazier?

    “You’re probably not going to win a lot of races on the downhill, but you can definitely lose it, as I almost verified today,” Mark Lowe said Saturday after he won the Mount Falcon trail race.

  • From the land Down Under

    Moving to Idaho Springs and teaching tennis in Evergreen is just one more move in a list of dramatic scenery changes for Amy Jensen.

    Get your globe and follow along: Jensen was born in Brisbane, Australia, before joining the University of California-Berkeley on a tennis scholarship. She was a five-time All America for the Golden Bears, and a three-time NCAA champion in doubles. She coached there for six years before coaching at the University of Denver for the past three years.

  • County chipping away at food-stamp backlog

    Nearly four months after Jefferson County's food assistance program led the state in backlogged applications, the county has reduced the log jam substantially.

    Some 96 applications are now lagging beyond the federally mandated 30-day limit for processing, down from 316 at the beginning of March. Lynnae Flora, the community assistance division's acting director, said the actual number is 56, because 40 of the applications are overdue because applicants haven't submitted all the necessary paperwork.

  • Online high school will lose money in first year, Stevenson says

    Jeffco Public Schools' new online high school will lose money its first year but should be self-supporting soon after, Superintendent Cindy Stevenson recently told a group of representatives from homeowner associations.

    Stevenson also gave an update on the district's budget and teacher contract negotiations at the June 3 meeting of the Council of Homeowner Organizations for a Planned Environment.

  • Voters to decide on term-limit extensions

    Jeffco voters will decide in November whether the county's elected officials - excluding the county commissioners - will be allowed to serve three consecutive terms, up from the current maximum of two.

    The decision by the county commissioners June 2 to refer the question to the November ballot marks an abrupt change from just several weeks ago, when District Attorney Scott Storey couldn't even get on the commissioners' agenda to propose a resolution extending his and other offices' term limits.

  • Open Space eyes trail changes at Apex Park

    The Jeffco Open Space Department is holding two open houses to gather information from the public on how to increase the safety of Apex Park users and to provide positive experiences at the park. Suggestions from the public are due June 30.

    Apex Park comprises 770 acres at the junction of U.S. 40 and County Road 93, adjacent to Heritage Square. The Apex Trail connects the Heritage Square parking lot with the Lookout Mountain Nature Center nearly 3 miles west.