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Today's News

  • Steller’s jays a common sight at area feeders

    The big bold, sassy, ubiquitous Steller’s jay in an index bird of the ponderosa pine forest. It is probably the best-known bird that comes to local feeders.

    It was the first bird I saw when we moved to Evergreen 45 years ago. As we were moving in, it was bouncing across our patio swearing at us for moving into its territory.

  • Helping a furry friend in need

    Oliver needed a friend.

    The 9-year-old chihuahua mix was sick, missing about half his teeth and hadn’t had a place to call home for more than a year. He was a hefty14 pounds — a bit much for a pooch his size, likely due to months of inactivity and a poor diet.

    Things weren’t looking good for him in general.

    He was scheduled to die on Jan. 19 at a metro-area animal shelter.

  • Solution for PERA spreads the pain around

    When I first met former Colorado attorney general Duane Woodard in 1981, he was a member of the Public Utilities Commission. He and the other two commissioners were charged with evaluating requests from utilities to raise their rates. A variety of businesses, governments and residential consumers that needed utility services would routinely challenge the rate hikes. The PUC needed to determine that utilities received a fair rate of return while ensuring that consumers got fair rates.

  • OBITUARY CORRECTION

    The Canyon Courier inadvertently published a photograph of the Rev. Vera E. Guebert-Steward with the obituary for H. Frost Theiss in the Feb. 10 issue. The obituary was republished on Page 8 this week. Pastor Vera continues to be in good health.

  • The sweetest month: Girl Scout cookies arrive; sales benefit local charities, Haitian relief

    For many, the annual drive by local Girl Scouts to sell cookies is one of the sweetest times of the year. But the effort also proves a sweet deal for mountain area charities.

    Groups such as the Evergreen Animal Protective League and Alpine Rescue will benefit from this year’s sales by the Blue Spruce Unit of the Girl Scouts. The unit, with 27 troops, includes 290 girls from schools in Evergreen, Indian Hills and Clear Creek County.

    Under a program called Hometown Heroes, each troop chooses a local charity to receive a donation of cookies.

  • Warm sounds at the Ice House

    When the Ice House Café opens its doors to musicians on Thursday nights, the result is like having a bunch of friends and relatives making music in someone’s living room.

    Thanks to entrepreneurs Charles and Cindy Shirley, the no-cover open-mic night has been a regular feature at the Ice House in downtown Evergreen for the last two years. The only requirement for taking the stage is to sign up and show up.

  • Musicians to hold benefit for Charles Shirley on April 18

    Members of the Ice House musician community are holding a benefit for Charles Shirley, co-owner of the Ice House, from 3 to 7 p.m. Sunday, April 18, at Center/Stage in Evergreen. Refreshments, wine and beer will be available. The suggested donation amount has not been decided.

    Shirley has been diagnosed with prostate cancer and is without insurance. The proceeds will be used to pay for his $30,000 surgery. As a result of the diagnosis, Cindy and Charles Shirley have decided to offer the Ice House for sale for $175,000.

  • Park district to hold workshops seeking public input

    The Evergreen Park and Recreation District is inviting the public to contribute to the design of the 2010 District-Wide Needs Analysis/Community Survey later this spring.

    The district is hosting two community workshops: at 9 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 20, at Wulf Recreation Center, 5300 S. Olive Road; and at 1:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 21, at Buchanan Park Recreation Center, 32003 Ellingwood Trail. All interested people are encouraged to attend.

  • Key 9-0 run leads Evergreen to sweep of Lobos

    CONIFER — The blueprint for an Evergreen boys victory this season has been to put teams away in the third quarter and enjoy the cushion in the fourth.

    The blueprint for an Evergreen loss this season as been to appear to have put teams away in the third, only to go cold and lose in the fourth.

    The Cougars defeated rival Conifer 60-54 on Feb. 10 with a new twist - lose a lead late, then explode offensively, step up defensively and hit timely free throws.

  • Cougars hang tough, but Lobos prevail again

    CONIFER — Variety is the spice of life. It goes pretty good with basketball, too.

    Faced with a dogged, revenge-bent rival Feb. 10, the Conifer Lobos concentrated on teamwork and getting everyone involved in a 52-50 victory over Evergreen.

    “I think a big part of it was we had a great crowd behind us,” Conifer guard Cara Walderman said. “We played as a team the entire time. We knew that we needed to pick up our defense ... that’s what we talked about at halftime.”