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Today's News

  • Mountain ride takes on twice the challenge

    Shortly after 7 a.m. on July 9, 53-year-old Dan Oracion felt like he was ready for the challenge he was about to embark on. The Casper, Wyo., cyclist was about to begin his journey in the 23rd annual Triple Bypass. Only this time, he was going to do it twice, both ways, in the same weekend.

    “I’ll have to make sure to recover real well tonight, get a good meal and get to bed early so my battery is recharged, my legs are recharged to do it again tomorrow,” he said.

  • Imes, Cougars end slide with sweep of Bear Creek

    The last out is a lot of times the hardest to get, even despite when one is pitching as well as Mike Imes was on July 9. The Evergreen starter baffled Bear Creek’s batters, scattering just four hits. But with his team leading 3-0 with one out to go in Game 1 of a doubleheader five straight balls threatened the win.

    However, Imes didn’t flinch.

  • Curtain could come down on Bergen Park movie theaters

    AMC Theatres is selling the Bergen Park 7 movie theater building and property, and the buyer could shut down the theaters that have been part of Evergreen for 17 years.

    Nearby business owners and the president of the Evergreen Area Chamber of Commerce are disappointed that Evergreen could soon be without a venue that provided entertainment for people of all ages without having to go down the hill.

    Ryan Noonan, director of public relations for AMC Theatres, said the company is in the process of selling the property.

  • Teen suspected in mom’s stabbing held in detention

    The teenager arrested last Wednesday in connection with the stabbing of his mother at their home on Red Fox Drive was being held in Mount View Detention Center in Denver as of Friday afternoon.

  • The importance of being pleasant

    I was recently at an awards ceremony where a local business executive was honored. In describing his philosophy about hiring employees, he noted that his first test is always to find pleasant people. That rang true with me, but I’d never heard anyone say it before.
    It made me wonder: Is pleasantness the most underrated human trait?

  • The importance of being pleasant

    I was recently at an awards ceremony where a local business executive was honored. In describing his philosophy about hiring employees, he noted that his first test is always to find pleasant people. That rang true with me, but I’d never heard anyone say it before.
    It made me wonder: Is pleasantness the most underrated human trait?

  • For women, a drive for justice

    Did your heart stir at the recent news of the bravery of Saudi women as they dared to drive? Here’s a new word, “mihrim,” one they know all too well because this male guardian is needed to walk them to the store, give them permission to travel out of the country, or accompany them to the hospital to give birth.
    Saudi religious police are gaining powers over women, humiliating them in public, even as women are beginning to be seen demonstrating all over the Middle East.

  • Great blue herons are not uncommon in foothills

    A reader of this column sent me a message via the Canyon Courier this past week, saying she had seen a great blue heron along North Turkey Creek and was wondering if that was unusual. Yes, it is a bit unusual this early in the season.

  • Former Jeffco official wants to testify in McCasky case

    Former Jeffco county administrator Jim Moore offered last week to testify in an ethics investigation of former commissioner Kevin McCasky, though the county apparently will not lift a confidentiality agreement and enable Moore to do so.

    Moore, who recently settled his wrongful-termination lawsuit against the county for $175,000, said that, during his time working for Jeffco, he kept detailed notes about county activities that he considered questionable.

  • 'Putnam County Spelling Bee’ spells out some feel-good fun