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Today's News

  • The illusion of safety (and its risks)

    Most Americans over the age of 40 grew up with an omnipresent fear of nuclear war. Fear might be too weak a word — terror is more like it.

  • Walsh brought stability to EHS

    When members of Evergreen High School’s senior class arrived for school in August 2008, new principal Matt Walsh greeted them. He was the fourth principal in four years at EHS. Their freshman class principal retired at year-end. Their sophomore class principal, despite prior successes and high expectations, was not a good fit and lasted just one year. Their junior class principal was a retired administrator who stayed one year in an interim capacity.

  • Sheriff's Calls

     

    Don’t look now

  • The Angry Llama migrates home

    The Angry Llama is feeling less mad these days after returning to its Conifer roots.

    The restaurant reopened April 10 at the Conifer Crossings building, the Angry Llama’s original space.

    “We really wanted to come back to Conifer,” said Cortland Coffey, student director for Journey Community Church. “A lot of people missed having a place to just come and hang out.”

  • Economic-development group seeks more funds from county

    The Jefferson County Economic Development Corp. is about to announce a new initiative designed to bring the county more than 7,500 full-time jobs over a five-year period — but it would cost taxpayers another $100,000 annually on top of the $300,000 the EDC already receives.

  • Sheriff addresses hot issue with ‘joke’

    Sheriff Ted Mink is characterizing as “a joke” his comment that “we could have a fire” if a government agency requested access to his records on concealed-carry permits for handguns in Jefferson County.

    Mink made the remark while speaking along with Park County Sheriff Fred Wegener to a March meeting of the 285 Corridor Tea Party. In response to a question from the audience about another government agency gaining access to those records with a warrant, Mink said: "We could have a fire. I mean, it happens."

  • Author to present haunting glimpse of ghost towns in the Rockies

    The tale of a ghost named Annabelle Stark who haunts the deserted town of St. Elmo in Chaffee County will be among stories that author Preethi Burkholder will tell during her presentation at the Timbervale Barn in Evergreen on April 27.

    “Rocky Mountain ghost towns are filled with chilling but captivating stories,” she said.

    While relating stories from her book “Ghost Towns of the Rockies,” Burkholder will discuss the former mining economy, which established them and later led to their demise. 

  • Meteorologist, professor say use of fossil fuels is creating a warmer atmosphere

    Chief meteorologist Mike Nelson of KMGH-TV 7 News says he gets a lot of e-mails from viewers criticizing him for talking about climate change.

    A percentage of people don’t believe that excess carbon dioxide produced by oil and gas usage is affecting the Earth’s atmosphere, Nelson said during his presentation on Monday night at The Place in Evergreen.

    Critics of climate change say it’s a myth, he remarked. But Nelson said there is overwhelming evidence to the contrary.

  • Fire training facility in Bergen Park taking shape

    Its steel structure is standing tall, and exterior walls are being placed on the fire training facility in progress at Fire Station 2 in Bergen Park.

    For the past few weeks, a J. Reed Construction crew has been working on the building, a three-story, pre-fabricated structure that will be 1,056 square feet in size. 

    “They’re putting walls up and using metal studs to start adding sheet metal,” said Evergreen Fire Chief Mike Weege.

  • A day for the Earth and its creatures

     A great horned owl peered knowingly at enthralled youngsters who came to the Mountain Area Earth Day Fair at Evergreen Lake on Saturday.

    Perched regally on the wrist of trainer Dana Remy, the owl and two other HawkQuest raptors were a main attraction at the Lake House, where most of the activity was centered.

    “It’s been humming in there,” said Christie Greene, earth day fair coordinator, while commenting on attendance.