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Today's News

  • Woman seriously injured in collision

    A woman suffered serious injuries in an accident at Evergreen Parkway and Bryant Drive on Wednesday morning, Trooper Josh Lewis of the Colorado State Patrol reported.

    The 2004 Jeep the woman was driving collided with a 2011 Audi sedan about 9:30 a.m. The woman was transported to St. Anthony Hospital in Lakewood, according the report.

    The cause of the accident had not been determined, Lewis said.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Evergreen firefighters extinguish blaze in remote cabin

    Evergreen firefighters extinguished a blaze that started in an exterior wall of a cabin off Upper Bear Creek Road early Wednesday morning.

    After receiving the call at 5:40 a.m., fire crews brought several engines and tenders containing water to the residence on Linn Court, said Evergreen Fire/Rescue spokesperson Stacee Montague.

    By 6 a.m., firefighters were dousing the blaze with water while working in below-freezing temperatures, Montague reported. Although there was smoke damage, the structure was saved.

  • Evergreen resident receives lifetime award for environmental efforts

    Recycling is all about education, says Evergreen resident Mereth Meade. By teaching people how to recycle unwanted materials, day-to-day efforts should come automatically, she says.

     

    As a child growing up with Swiss parents, Meade said she learned not to be wasteful. 

    “We never threw away leftovers,” she said. “We composted.”

  • Neighbors upset over goat slaughter in yard

    An Evergreen resident who saw two goats being slaughtered across the street in her neighbor’s front yard said the sight was upsetting to her. 

    LaKay Cecil, who lives near Wilmot Elementary School, said she wishes that her neighbors had gotten her permission beforehand. 

    Cecil said she previously had seen similar incidents.

    The resident who killed the animals, who asked not to be named, said they were rams being processed in a kosher manner for food.

  • Neighbors upset over goat slaughter in yard

     An Evergreen resident who saw two goats being clubbed and slaughtered across the street in her neighbor’s front yard said the sight was upsetting to her. 

    LaKay Cecil, who lives near Wilmot Elementary School, said she wishes that her neighbors had gotten her permission beforehand. 

    Cecil said she previously had seen similar incidents.

    The resident who killed the animals, who asked not to be named, said they were rams being processed in a kosher manner for food.

  • Neighbors upset over goat slaughter in yard

     An Evergreen resident who saw two goats being clubbed and slaughtered across the street in her neighbor’s front yard said the sight was upsetting to her. 

    LaKay Cecil, who lives near Wilmot Elementary School, said she wishes that her neighbors had gotten her permission beforehand. 

    Cecil said she previously had seen similar incidents.

    The resident who killed the animals, who asked not to be named, said they were rams being processed in a kosher manner for food.

  • Neighbors upset over goat slaughter in yard

     An Evergreen resident who saw two goats being clubbed and slaughtered across the street in her neighbor’s front yard said the sight was upsetting to her. 

    LaKay Cecil, who lives near Wilmot Elementary School, said she wishes that her neighbors had gotten her permission beforehand. 

    Cecil said she previously had seen similar incidents.

    The resident who killed the animals, who asked not to be named, said they were rams being processed in a kosher manner for food.

  • Neighbors upset over goat slaughter in yard

     An Evergreen resident who saw two goats being clubbed and slaughtered across the street in her neighbor’s front yard said the sight was upsetting to her. 

    LaKay Cecil, who lives near Wilmot Elementary School, said she wishes that her neighbors had gotten her permission beforehand. 

    Cecil said she previously had seen similar incidents.

    The resident who killed the animals, who asked not to be named, said they were rams being processed in a kosher manner for food.

  • Protecting Bear Creek watershed water quality

    Extended drought conditions and non-point-source pollution are concerns for those who monitor water quality in the Bear Creek watershed.

    “We’re going to have a little less water and will have to adjust,” Russ Clayshulte, Bear Creek Watershed Association manager, said during a panel discussion on April 4.

    According to recent data from Snowtel, the snowpack was 74 percent of the normal amount, he said.

  • 'A whole lot more than chickens'

    Returning to a simpler time when people grew the food they ate is a dream of those involved in community gardening efforts. 

    During his presentation, Rusty Collins, Denver director for the Colorado State University Extension Service, said that only 1 percent of the food consumed in the state is grown locally. Shifting that percentage to 20 by the year 2020 is a goal of his organization, he said.

    “Urban agriculture is a whole lot more than chickens,” Collins told a group at the Evergreen Fire/Rescue auditorium on Sunday.