Today's News

  • State ethics commission will investigate McCasky

    The Colorado Independent Ethics Commission has initiated a full investigation into the hiring of former Jeffco commissioner Kevin McCasky by an economic council to which he voted to direct county funds while being considered for the council’s high-paying top job.

    McCasky, now president of the Jefferson Economic Council, was hired by the nonprofit in January, shortly after he proposed increasing the county’s annual general-fund contribution to the council from $380,000 to $400,000.

  • Dolan to sever ties with Elk Creek

    Embattled former Elk Creek fire chief Bill Dolan apparently has agreed not to accept the latest paid position created for him with the district.

    Interim fire chief Pete Igel said Dolan agreed to remove himself from consideration for the recently created administrative coordinator post at a meeting last Friday that included district board members Len Wisneski and Alec Schwartz, Dolan and Igel.

  • Budget cuts can’t be gleaned from green

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden employs 2,300 and generates many more spinoff jobs as it operates within its budget of $350 million. NREL’s Research Support Facility has won numerous awards as it influences the way energy is consumed. From concept to completion, it is changing commercial building design nationwide. Solar panels, windmill blades, contracts and, uh-oh, progress are all part of NREL.

  • It’s past time for a true leader

    Every now and then, New York Times columnist David Brooks hits the nail right on the head, as he did last week. Writing about the upcoming presidential election, he noted that “the two parties contesting this election are unusually pathetic. Their programs are unusually unimaginative. Their policies are unusually incommensurate to the problem at hand.”
    Why? Because in Brooks’ words, “this election is about how to avert national decline.”

  • Bird migration studies provide fascinating information

    I have been re-reading the new book, “Songbird Journeys” by Miyoko Chu. Since I read it the first time and mostly late at night, I didn’t retain some of its wonderful information.

    So I am finding it most informative the second time around. Many of you have written or called me with questions about bird migration, so I had planned to write such an article for some time.

  • Sheriff's Calls



    A wrinkle in crime

  • Rough rides at Evergreen Rodeo

    For 45 years now, the Evergreen Rodeo, with all its cowboys and cowgirls, has thrilled the crowd at the El Pinal Rodeo Arena. It’s a Father’s Day weekend tradition like none other. Without further ado, we look back on the highlights of yet, another fun-filled wild west weekend in Evergreen: 

    Tim Shirley’s had a rough go of it lately not that he’ll remember it. Literally.

  • YESTERYEAR: Saddle up and ride — the Sheriff’s Mounted Posse

    The Sheriff’s Mounted Posse of Jefferson County began in February 1952, when the initial 30 deputies were sworn in by Sheriff Carl Enlow. Enlow, a Republican who served as county sheriff from 1949 to 1957, considered the creation of the posse, along with radio communication and marked patrol cars, as his major contributions to the department.

  • Sculpture Walk is woven into Evergreen’s consciousness

    Even after 18 years in existence, very few people know they have Art for the Mountain Community to thank for the vast array of public art that greets us at every turn in Evergreen. AMC is a dedicated group of professional artists and art lovers who come together each year to select innovative, whimsical and beautiful sculptures to welcome visitors and citizens alike to our mountain town.

  • Windy Saddle land offered to Jeffco Open Space

    A local conservation group has offered to Jeffco Open Space a key piece of vacant view property consisting of 2.3 acres bordering Windy Saddle Park on Lookout Mountain.

    The land is zoned MR-1, or low-density mountain residential, and contains the abandoned foundation of a house.

    In 2008, the Clear Creek Land Conservancy acquired a conservation easement on the property, which is a quarter mile from the Lookout Mountain Nature Center. In 2010, it acquired fee title, or ownership, of the property.