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Today's News

  • Northwestern football players 7, NCAA 0

    I’m no union guy. I think the unions have generally outlived their usefulness in our country, and that’s why only about 11 percent of American workers are union members, compared to nearly one-third in the early ’70s. Today the majority of union members are employees in the public sector, where the relationship between employer and employee has always been more contractual than relational.

  • Board, teachers must be reasonable

    Impasse!

    It’s a word that hardly sounds positive when it comes to a negotiation. And yet, it is what the teachers union declared last week before walking out on negotiations for a new contract with the Jefferson County Board of Education.

    Not to be the eternal optimist, but designation of an impasse may be just what the doctor ordered, as it will lead to designation of a mediator between two groups that seem to have little trust for each other in a possible standoff where there’s plenty of blame to go around.

  • ‘Wedding Singer’ a blissful visit to the ’80s

    Every decade has its own unique vibe. The 1920s had fringed flappers dresses, and the ‘60s and ‘70s had bellbottoms. The 1980s was a decade of excess — fluorescent clothing, sky-high shoulder pads and consumerism gone wild. 

  • EHS students get their teeth into improving fitness

    Evergreen High School’s health classes have gone high-tech now that each student wears a Jawbone UP, a wristband that collects data on an individual’s exercise, sleep patterns and food intake, and the information can be downloaded to the student’s smart phone or computer.

    Science teacher Ali Meyers received $7,000 in grants to buy 60 wristbands, and each student wears one for at least eight weeks to gauge overall fitness. CenturyLink provided $5,000, and ING U.S. Foundation donated $2,000.

  • CDOT seeks $10 million grant for shoulder lane

    State transportation officials are applying for a $10 million federal grant to supplement the $20 million currently set aside to build the shoulder lane on eastbound Interstate 70.

    Construction is scheduled to start in June on the “peak-period shoulder lane” between Empire and Idaho Springs.

    Officials have asked Idaho Springs city council members for a letter of support for the $10 million federal grant request. The letter was expected to be approved at a council meeting this week, said City Administrator Cindy Condon.

  • Sports briefs

    GIRLS BASKETBALL
    Lady Cougars summer camp is scheduled for June 2-5

    The annual Evergreen Lady Cougars girls basketball camp is scheduled for June 2-5 at Evergreen Middle School.
    The camp will run daily from 1-3 p.m., for incoming 3rd to 5th graders and from 3-5 p.m., for incoming 6th to 8th graders.
    Cost is $65, which includes a camp T-shirt.
    A link for registration form can be found online at http://ehsbasketballgirls.weebly.com/cougar-camp-3-8th-grade.html. Pre-registration is encouraged.

  • Molleur stays near the front, takes 2nd

    LAKEWOOD — Maybe Collin Molleur wasn’t giving himself enough credit, but the Evergreen sprinter certainly had fun running against Cherokee Trail’s Brandon Singleton at the Pomona Invitational on April 12.
    “I knew that kid on the inside lane was really, really fast. I knew that he was going to go out really fast. I just tried staying with him, and it got me into second,” Molleur said.

  • Experience pays off for Conifer

    By Craig Harper
    For the Courier
    Maddie Yerks was the lone returning Conifer player who tasted victory in last year’s tennis dual meet with Evergreen, participating in a doubles win late in the Lady Cougars’ 6-1 romp. So it was fitting that her victory in No. 3 doubles sealed the Lady Lobos’ 4-3 triumph on April 9 at Evergreen High School.

  • Conifer duo, penalties lift Lobos

    Drew Williams and Stone Henderson make for quite the one-two punch. Evergreen found that out the hard way on April 10 at Evergreen High School.

  • Linn brings experience with Forest Service, EPA to park board candidacy

    During the years she spent with the Environmental Protection Agency, Evergreen resident Peg Linn worked with people living near Superfund sites to resolve issues around them.

    "Having worked with the community to reach agreements, I feel like it will help make me a good park board candidate," Linn said. 

    While employed at the regional office of the EPA in Denver, Linn traveled to areas in Clear Creek and Summit counties where there were abandoned mines generating hazardous waste.