Today's News

  • Where the bears are — and how to keep them at a distance

    “We are in bear habitat,” said wildlife manager Ty Petersburg of Colorado Parks and Wildlife, speaking last Thursday at a meeting of the Evergreen Alliance for Sustainability.

    People who live in mountain areas need to be aware of the bruins' presence and take measures to keep a safe distance, Petersburg said.

    “Everyone wants to talk about saving the bears,” Petersburg said.

  • Volunteers create trail at Elk Meadow Park

    More than 60 volunteers worked with Jeffco Open Space staff to transform a well-used informal path into a stable trail at Elk Meadow Park on Saturday. After Open Space staff completed grading for the Noble Meadow Trail, volunteers hauled wheelbarrows filled with finely crushed rock and placed it on the path.

    “It’s hard work, but it’s enjoyable,” said volunteer Hannah Mehsikomer. “I use the trails a lot, and it’s a way of paying back.”

  • Denver Parks closes parking lot at Cub Creek Park

    The parking lot for Cub Creek Park off Brook Forest Road is closed, and some residents are wondering why.

    Cub Creek runs along a small section of park, where people sometimes stop and have lunch or watch the stream flow. However, Denver Parks has closed parking at the park "to de-emphasize its use,” said Bob Finch, director of natural resources for the Denver parks system. People who would like to access the park from Brook Forest Road can park along the shoulder, Finch said.

  • Fire ban announced in Jeffco

    After the wet spring and early summer, things have finally dried out.

    On Thursday, officials in Jefferson and Clear Creek counties announced fire bans because of continuing high fire danger. Any fires built in either county must be built in existing fire grates in parks and campgrounds.

    In addition, residents are not allowed to:

    • Shoot off fireworks.

  • School board recall is OK’d for November election ballot

    Colorado’s secretary of state has approved a Jeffco ballot that will include a recall question targeting the three conservative members of the school board in the Nov. 3 election, according to the county clerk’s office.

  • ‘Mockingbird’ a powerful production about race, justice

    You couldn’t open a newspaper or Web browser this summer without hearing about the new novel “Go Set a Watchman.” This book was the second published novel of Harper Lee, the famous author of the beloved classic “To Kill a Mockingbird.” Although the new book’s release caused a resurgence in interest in the reclusive author, interest in Lee’s first book never waned, and “To Kill a Mockingbird” is one of the best-selling novels of all time.

  • A painful lesson: Jeffco’s third rail

    I’ve been planning for weeks to offer my thoughts on the controversy surrounding the Jeffco school district. And I’ve also been procrastinating for weeks. Of late, our politically polarized school system has become the third rail of local politics — touch it, and you die.

    A phone call last week from a loyal reader stirred me from my inertia (some would say cowardice). The gentleman raised several good questions about our recent coverage and, as a result, helped me organize my own thoughts. He should call daily.

  • Canyonfest a kick for kids, adults

    Sandi Ashley and her 9-year-old son, Logan, were in a heated battle at Canyonfest at Kittredge Community Park on Saturday.

    They were playing a game that involved using straws to move tiny sailboats along tracks created from two long pieces of gutter filled with water. Logan won.

    “That was a good workout,” Sandi said after their last round. She didn’t mention that some of her huffs and puffs went to help Logan move his sailboat.

  • Photographer wants to tell the stories of Evergreen’s women

    A local portrait photographer wants Evergreen women to meet one another in a unique way.

    Katy Moses has begun what she calls the Evergreen Women Project. During the Open Door Studios tour last weekend, she began photographing Evergreen women and collecting information so she can tell their stories on her website, EvergreenWomen.com.

    She is asking the women what brought them to Evergreen and about their lives.

  • Angel-makers are heaven-sent

    In the mid-1800s, quilting bees were an important social event, with women chatting and laughing as their sewing needles worked in the fabric.

    Fast-forward to 2015, and the Mount Evans Home Health Care & Hospice angel-making workshops also are important social events, with women chatting and laughing as they spread glue, cut cardboard and prepare handcrafted angels.

    In addition, angel-making helps Mount Evans continue to provide services to area residents.