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Today's News

  • New candle, home goods shop debuts at the Yellow Barn

    In a corner of Conifer there’s now a little pocket of Denver — or at least a shop that feels a lot like a city boutique with its handmade candles, locally roasted coffee and a steady stream of indie music on the speakers.

    But Yellow Barn Candles + Homegoods also has a distinctive mountain feel to it: From the natural wood shelving and poured pinecone candles to handcrafted Mexican blankets and the shop’s circular barn logo, the place reflects the community it’s in.

  • Evergreen man details his father’s secret past in new book

    How well do you know your family history?

    This is the question Evergreen resident Richard Mancuso would ask via his first book, “The Good Don,” based on his father who had been a “don”-type figure in Manhattan, N.Y., during the Great Depression.

    Mancuso, who is originally from New York, described how, growing up, he never knew about his father’s previous role as a “don” in the neighborhood, but there was always some suspicion.

  • Inter-Canyon Fire approves participation in cancer program

    The Inter-Canyon Fire Protection District board of directors approved participation in a newly established program that provides financial awards to firefighters diagnosed with one of five types of cancer — brain, skin, digestive, hematological or genitourinary.

  • Indian Hills to debut short movie on town’s history

    Residents of Indian Hills soon will have an opportunity to delve into the history of their community.
    A new 10-minute movie about Indian Hills is scheduled to play before the July 3 community movie in Arrowhead Park. It was a collaborative effort between Katie Linder-Jesse, the new town historian; Alison Vigil, an Indian Hills resident and producer at Root Sports; and more.

  • Sheriff's Calls

    Sticking to her story

  • Conifer’s Midway House opened to the public before it becomes part of Jeffco Open Space

    The iconic Midway House has been a familiar site as westbound drivers come around the bend on U.S. 285 and gaze on Aspen Park.

    The home, which has been owned by the Meyer family since 1950, was a lodge for travelers on their way to Bailey in the late-1800s. Now, it will become part of Jeffco Open Space, and the Conifer Historical Society hopes it will be turned into a museum to highlight the area’s rich history and the part the house played in getting miners and tourists into western Colorado.

  • 4-year-old Kai Bianco continues his recovery after being bitten by the family dog three years ago

    Kai Bianco likes to fly — on swings, that is.

    The 4-year-old, who was bitten in the head by the family dog when he was 9 months old, loves to play on the swings at Kittredge Park.

    He prefers going higher and higher as his parents, Shelby Foley and Brandon Bianco, push. Sometimes he opts to get out of one swing, only to move to the neighboring swing.

    “Go fast,” he says repeatedly to his parents, and when he does, he adds: “Man, I am going fast.”

  • Story joins state Senate race in District 16

    Tammy Story, the Conifer woman who last year challenged State Rep. Tim Leonard for the House District 25 seat, is running for state Senate.

    Story, whose campaign officially kicks off June 27, said Sunday that while she considered running again for Leonard’s seat in 2018 she felt she could better serve the public at a district level.

  • DEED ready to ask Jeffco to create the Evergreen Local Improvement District

    Following a town hall meeting last week, the Downtown Evergreen Economic District will submit its proposal for an Evergreen Local Improvement District to Jefferson County officials in the coming weeks.

    Until then, DEED is incorporating feedback it received from the meeting's attendees into its proposal and will send it to county attorneys for review soon, DEED board member Rachel Emmer confirmed.

  • 30 years of sweet memories baked into Pine Grove’s Rhubarb Festival

    Rhubarb: that pink and green spray of stalks that grows almost wild in some backyards and invariably finds its way into sauces, jams and the perennial strawberry-rhubarb pie.

    For some, the vegetable is an enduring heirloom from childhood — conjuring fond memories for the heart and the mouth. For others, it’s the thread that stitches the community together. For others still, it’s simply a good excuse to gather with friends and family in Pine Grove for the annual festival that celebrates all things rhubarb.