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Today's News

  • Creatures of habitat: Visitors to Staunton State Park’s annual Marmot Fest learn about the furry critters

    There were marmots aplenty at Staunton State Park on Saturday, albeit in the form of toys, sock puppets and children performing marmot skills.

    The fourth annual Marmot Fest taught children and adults alike about the little critters that live in the park and at higher elevations. Yellow-bellied marmots weigh from 14 to 16 pounds and are known as whistle pigs thanks to the high-pitched sound they make to signal danger.

    This year, children and adults also could try out rock climbing in addition to other marmot-related activities.

  • Festivities galore to celebrate the Fourth of July

    Area residents have plenty of options for Fourth of July activities — from the Freedom Run in north Evergreen to the Evergreen Music Festival at Buchanan Park to events in Indian Hills.

     

    Freedom Run 5K

    The Freedom Run to benefit Mount Evans Home Health Care & Hospice begins at 8 a.m. at Evergreen Middle School, winds through the Hiwan subdivision and ends at Nick’s Pro Fitness, where a party is planned.

  • An atmosphere of camaraderie: Bailey Day brings community together

    The 38th annual Bailey Day on Saturday had something for everyone, both newcomers and veterans of the event.

    Wild West characters mingled with a Sasquatch, who called the event wonderful and “squatchy,” and visitors frequented booths sponsored by businesses, nonprofits, service organizations and emergency responders. Attendees took part in a cook-off, took photos in old-time costumes, listened to music and ate great food.

    And some chopped wood. Yes, chopped wood.

  • A smooth operation: Volunteers help the Evergreen Rodeo Parade stay on track from start to finish

    The 51st annual Evergreen Rodeo Parade on Saturday was all spectators could hope for: floats, vintage cars, nonprofits, live bands, politicians, fire trucks — an example of everything a small-town parade should be.

  • Rodeo parade displays the best of Americana

    The entries in the Evergreen Rodeo Parade on Saturday were as diverse as the organizations here.

    Some entries adhered to the “Best of the Wild Wild West” theme, while others diverged from the Western theme.

    The Friends of Evergreen Dog Park walked with dogs alongside a car decorated like a dog, while senior citizens from Elk Run rode in a mock covered wagon with “Oh, What a Beautiful Morning” from the musical “Oklahoma!” playing.

  • Friends of Evergreen Dog Park take part in multi-agency working group

    Friends of Evergreen Dog Park are keeping pressure on authorities to have an off-leash dog park in Evergreen, organizers told about 30 people who attended a group meeting last Thursday.

    In February, Jeffco Open Space announced that the 107-acre Elk Meadow dog park on Stagecoach Boulevard was in danger of closing because of overuse, and despite meetings at which residents gave suggests for solving issues, officials ultimately closed it.

  • Educational signs from Braille Trail loop stolen at Genesee Park

    Dozens of educational signs were stolen from the Braille Trail loop in Genesee Park last month.

    The 37 Braille interpretive signs asked passers-by to take in the sounds, smells and textures of nature as a way of enhancing the park experience for the visually impaired, Denver Mountain Parks representatives said.

    The signs were along the Braille Trail and Chavez Trail, which are part of the Beaver Brook Trailhead off Stapleton Drive.

  • Rupert asks voters to be re-elected

    In 2015, Brad Rupert announced his bid for a seat on the Jeffco school board after three board members — John Newkirk, Ken Witt and Julie Williams — were targeted for recall by community members who felt they lacked accountability, transparency and general respect for the community they were elected to serve. Running on a platform of outcome-focused decision-making and with a desire to rebuild trust in the community, Rupert was ultimately elected treasurer of the board and replaced Williams.

  • 90-year-old Lee Sweetland is a familiar face at Evergreen Lake

    Lee Sweetland is a familiar sight to those frequenting Evergreen Lake in the mornings.

    The 90-year-old, carrying a wooden staff, is an almost daily walker near the Lake House. He used to walk along Bear Creek to the dam and back, but with the North Lake Trail closed, he makes do with walking the triangle along the creek, across the boardwalk and through the parking lot.

    He walks because he knows how important it is to stay active, especially at his age, and because he loves both the outdoors and Evergreen.

  • Junior mountain-bikers give it their all

    Mountain biking season is in full swing, and with that, the Evergreen Park & Recreation District junior mountain biking program kicked off last week at Elk Meadow and Alderfer/Three Sisters.

    The junior program — for ages 8-12 — has been running for six years. This year, though, EPRD added an advanced mountain biking program for 10- to 16-year-olds who are transitioning between the junior program and a high school team, said recreation supervisor Kendra Lind.