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Today's News

  • The Bypass: no ordinary summer ride

    When drawing up ideal weather conditions for a bike ride, Saturday, July 12, would be a day to put in a time capsule.

    Riders that took part in the 20th annual Triple Bypass were treated to sunny skies and temperatures in the 70s as they made their way from Bergen Park over Juniper, Loveland and Vail passes before settling in Avon 120 miles later.

    The 10,000-foot gain in elevation certainly isn't easy, but the riders had plenty of resources at their disposal before even hopping on their bikes.

  • OPEN HOUSES THIS WEEKEND

    For a listing of open houses this weekend in the area, refer to the Courier's printed real estate section, and check the Marketplace area of our home page.

  • McCasky's deeds don't match his words

    County Commissioner Kevin McCasky (Canyon Courier June 18) does an outstanding job summarizing commissioners’ responsibilities regarding land use decisions. But he doesn’t practice what he preaches. He writes of preserving “charm and beauty,” sustainability and improving property values. Many of his decisions do the opposite. He notes that, legally, his decisions cannot be subjective, yet his votes often ignore the bulk of citizen and expert testimony, community plans and county staff recommendations.

  • Election officials pushing postal option

    Jeffco election officials are continuing to suggest that registered voters sign up to be permanent mail voters and join the 58 percent of registered county residents — 152,038 as of June 30 — who have chosen that option.

    Becoming a mail voter will help ease the Election Day burden at the polls and ensure that residents don’t feel rushed to vote, said Pam Anderson, Jeffco’s clerk and recorder. She added that many voters also have a hard time making it to their polling places on Election Day.

  • Asphalt shortage threatens paving projects statewide

    A nationwide asphalt shortage is jeopardizing road projects across the state during the peak of the 2008 paving season.

    "This caught us completely by surprise," said Jeff Kullman, a regional director for the Colorado Department of Transportation. "There are critical interstate projects we won't be able to deliver on."

    CDOT says 34 projects could be affected by the shortage.

    In the last two weeks, CDOT has learned from suppliers that there will not be enough asphalt to complete projects that have already gone out to bid.

  • Ipomopsis, and July 4th at Evergreen Lake

    How did it become the 4th of July already? Half the year is gone. Spring and the magical month of May are long gone, but just today I received a copy of the birds recorded at Evergreen Lake during May. It was compiled by Warren Roske from the list displayed on the lake bulletin board by Warren and several other regular visitors, especially Loie Evans, who rarely misses a morning bird walk around the lake.

  • Sunday liquor sales come to Evergreen

    Several Evergreen liquor store owners and managers said that July 6 — the first Sunday they were allowed to sell alcohol in decades — was a good day, but said they need more time to see if the change will increase profits.

    “I would say I was favorably impressed with the very first Sunday, and there was no real marketing,” said Edward Skaff, president of Evergreen Liquors. “Most of the people were very happy that we were open on Sunday.”

  • Concerts and community mark Independence Day at Evergreen Lake

    Last Friday, as proud citizens from sea to shining sea gathered in backyards, town squares and city parks to honor the vast, sovereign community that is America, hundreds of local patriots celebrated the liberty-loving slice of it that is Evergreen by toasting the Republic with smiles, suds and Sousa at the Evergreen Music Festival’s star-spangled Fourth of July at the Lake.

  • Sheriff's employees get raises after all

    Jeffco sheriff's deputies and other employees at the sheriff's office have received a 3 percent raise, months after being told it wasn't possible.

    The raises were effective July 1.

    "The ability to effect this pay increase is possible in part because of the diligent management of our overtime resources," Sheriff Ted Mink said in a June 23 memo. "New scheduling plans and judicious management have enabled us to proved this pay increase within our existing budget."

  • Time travelers make a trip to commissioners' offices

    It was late in the workday July 2, and Pam Penton was getting ready to leave her job at the information desk just inside the Jefferson County Courts and Administration Building.

    And then things turned weird.

    A man outfitted from head to toe in Revolutionary War regalia, accompanied by two children in similar garb, asked where he could find the commissioners’ offices. The man also was carrying an American flag on a 5-foot pole.