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Today's News

  • Cougars fall in three OT's

    Evergreen’s Christian Harriman lay on his stick, five feet from the goal, with just over two minutes to play in a tied lacrosse game against the Castle View Sabercats on March 25 – the victim of a devastating blow by a Sabercats defender.

    But Harriman had one very important thing going for him: he had the ball.

    “I was on the ground and I went to get up and leaned forward, and the stick came out from under me and the ball rolled in,” Harriman said.

  • Evergreen businessman running for governor

    An Evergreen businessman who has always maintained a Lincoln-esque dream of running for office has his sights on the top elected office in the state.

    Dan Maes, 48, a virtual political unknown, believes his dearth of visibility, lack of name recognition and in-the-trenches experience will work in his favor.

  • Lesson Plans: Freshman wins poetry championship at EHS

    Evergreen High School freshman Abby Rosenberg won the March Madness championship round.

    But not in basketball — in poetry.

    Rosenberg’s poem, “The Forbidden Fruit,” bested 63 other poems written by both student and professional poets to win the competition at the high school. The poem is about battling addiction.

    Second place went to sophomore Alison Michelin, whose poem “The Nightmare Before Christmas” was a spoof of the movie and a retelling of “ ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas.”

  • Wulf will shed court to expand weight room

    The Evergreen Park and Recreation District board voted 4-1 Tuesday night to expand the weight room at the Wulf Recreation Center by sacrificing one of two racquetball courts.

    Board member Peter Eggers delivered the only no vote, saying he was worried that an expanded weight room with just one court would fall short of people’s expectations and revenue projections.

    Board members Janet Heck Doyle, Allan Casey, Roger Hoaglund and Kit Darrow voted in favor of the expansion, which will cost about $65,000. About six people spoke in favor of saving the courts.

  • Our Readers Write

    Opposition to Buchanan plan is not new

    Editor:

  • The lessons to learn from a down economy

    The other day, a friend told me he believes there’s a good chance our kids’ generation will face the same kind of Depression-era challenges our grandparents did. I don’t know whether that’s true. I sure hope not.

    If we had our way, of course, our kids would never face economic hardship. Difficult times lead to deferred dreams, missed opportunities, strained relationships and, in some cases, poverty. There’s nothing good about job losses and a stagnant market.  

  • Earmark reform, not elimination

    When President Obama signed a $410 billion budget bill last week, the story might have been that Congress failed to pass its fiscal 2009 budget until almost half the fiscal year was over. Instead, the discussion was about earmarks.

    Earmark has become a dirty word. Candidates badmouthed earmarks in the last election, and John McCain said Obama should have vetoed the budget compromise because it contained them.

  • Goshawks again brooding over Evergreen

    While I was visiting Bosque del Apache, an exceptionally fine photograph of a northern goshawk was printed in the Community Eye feature of the Canyon Courier. It was taken by Richard Gristak on Bear Mountain. I was pleased to see this beautiful bird’s photo for two reasons: one, because I have not seen a goshawk in the area for some time, and secondly, because I had been wondering what hawk was making the birds at my feeder so antsy.

  • Open Space could save $5 million by refinancing loans

    The Jefferson County Open Space Division might be able to buy more land after it refinances more than $70 million in loans to take advantage of low interest rates.

    “Unfortunately, the economy is bad, but it also creates the opportunity for us to do better with our bonds,” said Open Space Director Ralph Schell.

    Schell said the open space program took out about $160 million in loans in 1999 to buy land. The county currently pays an average interest rate of 4.94 percent on the remaining debt, but prevailing rates are nearly 2 points lower.

  • County ‘sales pitch’ irks citizen budgeters

    Some members of the citizen panel asked to prioritize $277 million in county spending over the next four years are growing tired of the “sales pitch” from the county and want to get to work.