.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Postmaster shuffle in mountain area

    The Evergreen and Conifer post offices are playing musical chairs with their postmasters.

    When Evergreen postmaster Sid Henderson left to become postmaster in Parker, Lisa Mantey left the Conifer postmaster position to become the temporary Evergreen postmaster, known as the officer in charge.

    Trudy Finan, who has been Eagle’s postmaster, is filling in as Conifer’s officer in charge while Mantey is at the Evergreen post office.

  • Jeffco sheriff joins countywide auto theft task force

    Car thieves in Jeffco now must combat a much more organized police presence.

    The Jefferson County Regional Auto Theft Task Force, which launched July 1, teams car-theft investigators from the Jeffco Sheriff's Office and police from Arvada, Lakewood and Wheat Ridge.

  • Church raising funds for football bleachers

    This October, Evergreen High School might be able to host a home football game for the first time since 1978.

    The school, whose current bleachers seat a little over 300, may be getting larger, portable bleachers with the help of Journey Community Church, Conifer High School and the Jefferson County school district.

    Conifer and Evergreen high schools will share the bleachers, which can seat 2,000 people.

  • County to seek legislation granting more power to regulate bicyclists

    Amid the controversy over a proposed charity bicycle event on Deer Creek Canyon Road, the Jeffco commissioners will propose state legislation that would give them more authority to bar cyclists from some county roads altogether.

  • Girl and dog enjoy first race together

    EVERGREEN — Running, or any form of exercise, is typically more enjoyable when you have someone to share the experience with.

    Abby Bond likes to run. She also likes her 11 year-old dog, Sasha.

    About a month ago, the 14 year-old Bond combined her two interests. The results were magic.

    The duo set out a couple of times a week on runs that would go around three miles. On the non-running days, Bond and her trusty sidekick made sure to at least get in a quality walk.

  • No guts, no glory

    EVERGREEN — Nathan Rice’s Fourth of July began with a thud and a little bit of blood.

    Rice was tripped up at the start line of the Freedom Run 5k and came away with a few cuts and scrapes on his hands and legs.

    The Lafayette resident didn’t stay down long. He quickly dusted himself off, then caught up with the lead pack and made his winning move with a half-mile to go, claiming the Freedom Run title with a time of 15 minutes, 39 seconds.

  • Mustangs outscore Cougars

    There were times when the Evergreen Cougars scored at will July 1 against the Ralston Valley Mustangs.

    There were times when the Mustangs did the same. And they did it more.

    The Cougars tried to keep pace as the Mustangs lit the proverbial barn and started running. Despite clawing back from an early hole, the Cougars were dropped 18-9 in five innings ahead of the final week of regular-season summer baseball.

  • Woman enters guilty plea in dog attack

    Evergreen dog owner Carol Peterson pleaded guilty to a class 2 misdemeanor June 29 for an incident in which her Labrador mix attacked a Hiwan Hills woman on May 18. Peterson paid $151 in fines and court fees. A restitution hearing is set for Sept. 14.

    The Hiwan Hills woman who was attacked was bitten five times on the backs of both legs while walking down the street near a home on 2957 Hiwan Drive.

  • Park district closes door on ‘real estate matter’

    For the second month in a row, the Evergreen Park and Recreation District board concluded a regular meeting by closing the doors to the public for a discussion about an unidentified “real estate matter.”

    The board of directors added the executive session to the agenda of the June 23 regular meeting at the last minute and did not reveal any details at the time. The Colorado Open Meetings Law has strict rules about closing meetings to the public, but boards can do so in the case of real estate and personnel matters.

  • Teens use henna for their body of work

    Creativity combined with henna dye for about 30 area teens, who learned the art of henna body painting last week.

    The youths attended a seminar July 1 at the Evergreen Library with henna artist Kandra Churchwell. Churchwell, who works professionally as a graphic artist, has learned to work with henna dye and spent an hour in the packed room helping girls and boys master the ancient art.

    In her 15-minute introductory lecture, Churchwell explained that henna body art is something that she and her family do for fun.