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Outdoors

  • Flutter of butterflies and unkindness of ravens

    By Christie Greene

    Some readers only buy non-fiction books on the grounds that nothing is more riveting than real-life events. Certain news stories result in rueful head shaking, meaning “you can’t make this stuff up.” On occasion, the term “fake news” might be employed to express doubt about the origin of information. Let me assure you that the “terms of venary” below may be hard to take seriously, and yet, they were a status symbol in the 13th and 14th centuries.

    ‘A group of children is called a migraine.’

  • OUTDOOR BRIEFS

    We’d like to know about events or activities of interest to the community. E-mail items of 75 words or less to news@evergreenco.com. Items will appear on a space-available basis.

     

    Jr. rangers wear many hats

    Kids ages 6 to 10 can expand their stewardship knowledge and practice some of the outdoor skills used by Jefferson County Open Space rangers from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Aug. 5, at at Lair o’ the Bear Park, 22600 Highway 74. No registration required.

     

  • Rolling Stones, ghosts and the Red Rocks Award

    Christie Greene

    In addition to living in the midst of some of the most spectacular scenery and wildlife viewing in the state, Denver’s foothills residents also enjoy close proximity to one of the country’s most famous and beloved outdoor event venues.
    Red Rocks has been touted as the country’s best outdoor amphitheatre by Rolling Stone Magazine, though the Rolling Stones, themselves, have never played there.

  • What a nice bell you have

    By Christie Greene

    What’s up with that baggy skin hanging under the chin of a moose? Is it fat, maybe from eating a few too many twigs? Maybe it’s attractive to other moose. Biologists are unsure what the purpose of the bell really is, but there are many hypotheses about why the moose grows one.

    The females may judge the size of the bell, as they do the size of antlers, to determine the bull’s fitness as a mate. Perhaps it is part of the male’s mating ritual of spraying urine, which splashes onto the bell.

  • Triple Bypass showcases Colorado’s outdoors cycling landscape

    Christie Greene

  • Fireworks not a friend to pets

    Christie Greene

  • Did the whistle pig steal my golf ball at Evergreen Golf Course?

    Christie Greene

  • Get ready to roll with mountain biking

    Christie Greene

  • Hummingbirds go into torpor at night to survive cold temps

    When folks come to Colorado and see the first hummingbirds arrive in mid-April, they are likely to mistake them for the well-known ruby-throated hummingbird. While they greatly resemble each other, there are noticeable differences between our spritely local species — the broad-tailed hummingbird — and the ruby-throated.

  • SHARE with your wild neighbors

    By Christie Greene

    She was lying in a shallow ditch, very still, when our dogs spotted her. They sniffed her curiously, and before we could react, one dog gave her a quick lick on the nose before we shooed them away.

    I very slowly approached the tiny elk calf, at first concerned about her condition. Was she hurt? Should I call Parks and Wildlife for help? I agonized that she may even be dead. She was so utterly still. Her body lay in a shallow ditch, her head resting quietly on the path.