.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Recreation plan for Conifer developing through efforts of citizen coalition

    For the past year Project Place, a group organized by the Conifer Recreation Coalition, has been identifying recreational needs for the community.

    With leadership from environmental designer and coalition member Mimi Mather, the group has developed a master plan for recreation in the greater Conifer area, which includes the U.S. 285 Corridor to Bailey, as well as the corridor to Evergreen.

  • Connector trail project at dam scheduled for spring

    The Colorado Department of Transportation has granted the permit for the connector trail at the Evergreen Lake dam, and the project is now scheduled for spring 2015, said Dean Dalvit of the Downtown Evergreen Economic District.

    “We reached out to the downtown merchants over the last few weeks,” Dalvit said, adding that the timing is designed to avoid the merchants’ busy season.

  • Board to finalize charter applications, superintendent goals

    The Jeffco Board of Education will vote on two charter school applications at its meeting Thursday in Golden.

    The meeting starts at 6:30 p.m. at the Jeffco Education Center, 1829 Denver West Drive, Building 27 in Golden. The board will meet for a study session in the boardroom at 5:30 p.m.

    The school board is expected to vote on the applications from the Alexandria School of Innovation and Golden View Classical Academy. 

  • Fire district raises possibility of tax increase

    If property tax revenues don’t improve in the next few years, the Evergreen Fire Protection District board may consider going to voters for a property-tax increase.

    Board members mentioned the possible mill-levy increase discussion during a meeting Oct. 28. Revenues in recent years have been $200,000 to $300,000 less per year than they were previously, George Kling, board president, said in a separate interview.

  • Fire district eyes bonuses for paramedics to control costs

    Paramedics could receive a bonus rather than a raise next year to help the Evergreen Fire Protection District manage a projected 2014 revenue decline of $200,000.

  • West Chamber honoring Emmer for work in sustainability

    Not many people would consider naming a consulting service “detritus,” a term for waste matter and debris. But for Evergreen resident Rachel Emmer, the term is more than appropriate for her Detritus Group Consulting service.

    The interaction between decomposed organic waste and the soil is “where the magic happens,” says Emmer.

  • Town hall meeting offers snapshot of Evergreen

    The town hall meeting sponsored by the Evergreen Pathfinders offered a smorgasbord of information to those in attendance last Thursday evening.

    Gathered at the Lake House, Evergreen residents learned about the community’s emerging creative district, a master trails plan, and services provided by charitable organizations. Attendees also heard farewell speeches from the retiring Jeffco sheriff and state representative for the area.

    A few highlights:

  • Troubled bridge over creek water

    As the owner of Evergreen Lake Park, Denver Parks and Recreation has asked the Evergreen park district to boost its contribution to replace the aging bridge over Bear Creek at the entrance to the popular area.

    The Evergreen Park and Recreation District, which manages the Lake Park, allocated $30,000 in its 2014 budget for the bridge project. An additional $10,000 for the work is in the budget proposal for 2015.

  • Fire destroys part of home on Lookout Mountain

    A fire Saturday night in a home on Vista Avenue on Lookout Mountain was contained to the garage and living room, which were destroyed. No one was injured

    Investigators are trying to determine the cause of the blaze, which also caused heavy smoke damage to the rest of the home, according to Tweets from the Mountain Fire Information Duty Officers of western Jefferson County.

  • A tale of healing and valor

    When writer Mark Kilburn first heard a traditional story told by Lakota medicine man David Swallow, he fell in love with it.

    “It's a powerful story,” he said.