Local News

  • 90 runners, walkers participate in annual Cougar Stride

    Saturday morning dawned cool and clear — perfect weather for a 5K.

    Nearly 90 runners and walkers gathered at Alderfer/Three Sisters Park at 8 a.m. to begin the Cougar Stride. The annual event, which winds its way to Evergreen High School, is a fund-raiser for the school’s instrumental music program.

    In 40-degree weather, participants registered for the event at the school before climbing into school buses to head to the starting line.

  • Resident questions ISO rating for home in Elk Creek fire district

    Resident Scott Melle, who lives in the Elk Creek Fire Protection District, says his homeowners insurance rate has increased by $1,000 a year because of an unfavorable ISO rating. Melle came to the Elk Creek fire board meeting last Thursday to find out when his property's ISO rating of 10 will be reviewed and possibly lowered.

  • Canyonfest a big deal in small town of Kittredge

    Kittredge Canyonfest is as small-town as a festival can get.

    “It’s really a Mayberry event,” said Russett Goulding, president of the Kittredge Civic Association, who was referring to the “Andy Griffith” television show.

    With booths, games, music, food, a duck race and the unique Gumby boat races on Bear Creek, this year’s festival on Saturday will have something for everyone, Goulding said.

  • Evergreen man who shot bear cubs to appear in court Oct. 8

    The Evergreen homeowner facing two felony charges and six misdemeanors for shooting two bear cubs is scheduled for a first appearance in Jefferson County court at 10 a.m. Oct. 8, when he will be advised of the charges against him.

    Daniel C. Williams, 50, fatally shot the cubs Sept. 1 as they were trying to get into his trash. One of the cubs died instantly, and the other was euthanized. The live round that hit the cubs then hit the window of a neighbor’s house in the 27000 block of Lupine Drive.

  • Resident objects to pro-gun-rights display at Evergreen Library

    An Evergreen resident says the pro-gun-rights display at the Evergreen Library is inappropriate for a public building.

    “I was kind of shocked when I saw it,” Lindrith Cordell said. “I am opposed to controversial things in public buildings.”

  • Serving up a big time at Big Chili

    The aroma of fragrant chili wafted through the air as people sampled recipes and voted for their favorites at the Big Chili Cook-off on Saturday at Buchanan Park.

    “I really like this one,” Zoe Shockites of Evergreen said while tasting Pam’s Game Day Red.

    Thousands of attendees could taste more than 100 varieties of red, green and vegetarian chili recipes, including those with eye-catching names like Ma-Mama’s Hillbilly Hand Grenade and Zydeco Zombie Green.

  • Kansas woman hit by vehicle, killed while crossing Evergreen Parkway

    A 29-year-old Kansas woman was struck and killed Tuesday night as she walked across Evergreen Parkway near Bergen Park.

    April Eure of Wichita was struck by a Subaru Impreza, according to Trooper Nate Reid, a State Patrol spokesman. The accident occurred 2 miles south of Interstate 70 about 8:45 p.m.

    Eure was walking with another person, who was not injured in the accident, Reid said. The two were not in a crosswalk, he said.

  • Informal online survey finds support for rule on securing trash

    More than 80 percent of local respondents want Jeffco officials to enact a rule designed to keep bears out of trash, based on an anecdotal online survey put together by an Evergreen resident.

    Some 168 people took the survey on a popular community social media website, after the issue came up in response to the fatal shooting of two bear cubs last week.

  • Fund-raiser planned Sept. 17 for Into Your Hands Africa

    Into Your Hands Africa, a local nonprofit that helps impoverished people in Uganda become self-sustaining, will hold a fund-raiser called Safari Around the World on Sept. 17.

    The organization, which is largely supported by Evergreen residents, benefits more than 500 Ugandan families each year through its programs, said Brenna Vaughn, executive director of Into Your Hands Africa.

  • Still working after all these years

    More senior adults are working these days rather than retiring in their mid-60s. The number of people ages 65 to 69 who are employed jumped from 22 percent in 1990 to 31 percent in 2010, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

    Some seniors keep working out of economic necessity. For others, work is the main attraction, even though the extra income may help.