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Local News

  • Open Space seeks bids for survey of Jeffco residents

     

    Jefferson County Open Space is in the process of hiring a company to generate and conduct a statistically valid opinion survey of a random sample of county residents.

    The invitation to bid on the job went out in mid-February, and responses are due March 1. Vendors' questions are due by Feb. 23. The projected cost is $25,000 to $30,000.

    Data collection probably will be done in the spring, with the results available in the fall or before the end of the year.

  • Park district to hold focus groups March 2, 3

    The company hired to compile a new park district master plan will be holding four focus groups with community members on the following days in the first week of March:

    • Wednesday, March 2, at the Buchanan Park Rec Center from noon to 2 p.m. and 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

    • Thursday, March 3, at the Wulf Recreation Center from 8 to 10 a.m. and 4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

  • Hiker rescued in snowstorm on Rosalie Peak

    After a 28-year-old hiker broke her leg at 13,000 feet on the flank of Rosalie Peak on Saturday, it took the combined forces of five mountain rescue teams to bring her down in a furious snowstorm, according to a statement provided by Park County Search and Rescue.

    A Flight for Life chopper attempted rescue at 3:40 p.m. but was forced to turn back because of the rapidly deteriorating weather.

  • Man found guilty in gun incident

    On June 30, 2010, rancher Cliff Farrell saw the big EDS trash truck coming down the road near his ranch off Blue Creek Road, at what he perceived was enough speed to threaten his horses, dogs and sheep. He decided to take the law into his own hands.

    Farrell, 76, and weighing135 pounds, put a gun on the seat of his pickup, parked the truck like a barricade at a gate and confronted the three-man crew.

  • Park district close to naming executive director

    The name of the finalist or finalists for the position of executive director of the Evergreen Park and Recreation District was expected to be released this week following the regular meeting of the board of directors Feb. 22.

    The board will hold a special public meeting to interview the finalist or finalists, Kit Darrow, president of the board, said Monday. The date of the meeting had not yet been determined.

    The board will go into executive session Tuesday night to discuss the choice of finalists, Darrow said.

  • Sheriff's office to probe Wikipedia changes

     Evergreen High School officials have enlisted the help of law enforcement to track down the person or people who altered the description of Evergreen High School on Wikipedia last week.

    Principal Matt Walsh sent an e-mail to parents on Feb. 16, saying that someone had altered the page to include "absolutely offensive hate speech directed toward several different groups of people who are an important part of our school and community."

  • Courier website to be subscription-only starting March 2

    Free access to local news and sports at www.canyoncourier.com is coming to an end.

    Beginning March 2, the Courier’s website will be available to paid subscribers only.

    "We intend to continue to provide the quality news and information you already enjoy, and in order to do that we are introducing the new paid-online policy," said Tim Zeman, publisher of the Courier.

    "The combination of Web and newspaper subscription together is even better than getting the newspaper alone," he said.

  • Sheriff's Calls

    Man assists cat stuck in tree

  • Commissioner feathered nest of future employer

    Jeffco Commissioner Kevin McCasky proposed an increase of $20,000 in the county’s contribution to the Jefferson Economic Council last year while he was a candidate for the private economic development organization’s top job, the Columbine Courier has learned.

  • The stars reach back: Planetarium comes to Wilmot to help students corral the cosmos

    Usually students go to the planetarium, but recently the planetarium came to the students.

    The Denver Museum of Nature & Science’s mobile planetarium visited Wilmot Elementary School on Feb. 3 and 4 so students could learn about constellations and planets in their own gym. The big black planetarium, which looked more like an unusually shaped bouncy house, could seat 30 students. It’s 18 feet high and 30 feet in diameter, and a computer and a projection screen were all it took to turn the black walls into the solar system.