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Local News

  • Tiny bubbles in the lake make fish happy, water fine

    Tiny bubbles rising to the surface of Evergreen Lake are improving water quality, along with the lives of fish living in the lake.

    Released through a recently installed aeration system, the champagne-like bubbles form through compressed air pumped to the bottom of the lake and diffused. When the water mixes with the air, levels of dissolved oxygen increase in the lake — making the environment healthier for aquatic life.

  • Tiny bubbles in the lake make fish happy, water fine

    Tiny bubbles rising to the surface of Evergreen Lake are improving water quality, along with the lives of fish living in the lake.

    Released through a recently installed aeration system, the champagne-like bubbles form through compressed air pumped to the bottom of the lake and diffused. When the water mixes with the air, levels of dissolved oxygen increase in the lake — making the environment healthier for aquatic life.

  • Former Evergreen man faces sentencing for unlawful sexual contact

    A former Evergreen resident found guilty of unlawful sexual contact involving an at-risk adult is facing a possible 18-month prison sentence.

    Ronald Ruhoff, 73, was charged with having inappropriate physical contact with a 29-year-old woman whom he met while working as a van driver for an area organization, according to a Jefferson County arrest affidavit.

  • Fire destroys home on Bear Mountain

     A couple and their dog escaped uninjured from a house fire on Bear Mountain early Thursday, but the home was destroyed.

  • Sheriff's Calls

    How conflict diamonds work

  • Residents' committee tours West Metro option for fire training

    Dramatic flames and heat burst from a prop stove at the West Metro Fire/Rescue Training Center in Lakewood during a demonstration for Evergreen residents last Thursday.

    The residents were taking a tour of the center, which they are suggesting as an alternative to building a training facility at Evergreen Fire Station 2 in Bergen Park.

  • Teen escapes injury after falling down mineshaft

    A 16-year-old Texas boy was rescued uninjured from an abandoned mineshaft in Kittredge on July 13 after falling down the opening while hiking with his brother.

    “He should’ve been dead,” said Jeffco sheriff’s spokesman Mark Techmeyer. “He was uninjured — unbelievable.”

    The boy and his 15-year-old brother, who were visiting family in Colorado, were hiking near Troublesome Gulch Road and came across a hole in the ground.

    “It ended up being an abandoned mineshaft,” Techmeyer said. 

  • Teams forming for Aug. 24 Relay for Life

    “I’m getting a team together,” said Evergreen resident Connie Ireland, who attended the July 10 kickoff party for the upcoming Mountain Area Relay for Life.

    Ireland attended the event to sign up for the American Cancer Society fund-raiser on Aug. 24. Like many others gathered that night at Mountain Home in Evergreen, cancer has taken its toll on Ireland’s family. Her father died of cancer, and Ireland’s two sisters and two brothers all have been cancer patients. 

  • Wildfires create surge in smoke-check calls

    Evergreen Fire/Rescue received 53 smoke-check calls in June, many of which are coming in the middle of the night, said dispatch supervisor Christy McCormick.

    A lot of the late-night calls were from residents who were seeing smoke pushing down from area wildfires, Evergreen Fire Chief Mike Weege said in his report to the fire district board at its July 10 meeting.

    The smoke-check calls last month are almost half of last year’s total of 112, noted McCormick. “We’re up to 127 for this year,” she said.

  • Mural project adding artistic dimension to nature center

     Dynamic paintings are bringing a creative dimension to the Evergreen Nature Center in the coming months.

     

    “It was important to me to have a strong, visual draw, and to add some context,” said Nature Center executive director Vanessa Hayes.

    Kittredge artist Philip Newsom has finished the first of five 4-foot-high murals depicting different ecosystems found in the area. Spruce-fir, ponderosa pine and riparian locales will be represented in the paintings that will be hung along the long wall near the center’s entrance.