.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Firefighters contain nighttime blaze in Cragmont

    A fire in a single-family residence in Cragmont in Evergreen on Feb. 8 caused moderate structural damage, but the residents and their pets escaped without injury.

    Evergreen Fire/Rescue received the 911 call at 10:45 p.m.

    About 25 firefighters and one emergency medical crew responded.

    When firefighters arrived at 28856 Cragmont Drive, they saw smoke coming from the open front door and the fire in the chimney chase on its way into the soffits, according to a Feb. 16 news release from Evergreen Fire/Rescue.

  • Hunter fined in Evergreen Highlands elk shooting

    The hunter who was charged with two misdemeanors in connection with an elk shooting in Evergreen Highlands has pleaded guilty to a lesser charge and was sentenced to pay a fine.

    On Dec. 20, Jefferson County Judge Bradley Allen Burback dismissed the charges of hunting in a careless manner and illegal possession of wildlife against Henry Austin, according to documents on file in the Jefferson County Courts.

  • Desperately seeking a gander

    A new companion still has not surfaced to help Nita the goose rebound from the loss of her beloved Pedro.

     

    Nita’s owners, Marie and George McLaughlin of Morrison, had hoped someone would have an older Chinese white goose who could live with Nita and help fill the void left by Pedro, who died recently of natural causes.

    Nita continues to waddle around her pen, honking and honking, and then she realizes that Pedro won’t be answering her call, Marie said.

  • District’s deal with unions pushes cuts to 2013-14 school year

    A deal reached between Jeffco Public Schools and its employee unions Feb. 11 would postpone tens of millions in budget cuts for at least a year and temporarily keep the district from cutting teaching positions.

    The agreement, which will require the Board of Education’s approval, delays 574 job cuts the district would have to make in the 2013-14 school year if voters do not approve a property-tax increase that is likely to be placed on the November ballot.

  • Sheriff's Calls

    Remember to lift with your legs

  • Cookie madness: Girl Scout troop 1373 hopes to sell 3,000 boxes to help fund trip

    Bill Bruce leaned on his snow shovel in his driveway Feb. 6 as three girls approached, pulling a little red wagon. When they were within earshot, they informed him of their mission: They were selling Girl Scout cookies.

  • Dykeman eager to ‘give back’ as chamber chair

    Nancy Dykeman eats, breathes and lives the Evergreen Area Chamber of Commerce.

    And for the next 11 months, she is at the helm of the organization as chairwoman of the board of directors. Dykeman is excited about the opportunities the chamber brings to her and the direction she can help bring to the chamber.

  • Facebook Diary: Coming face to face with Evergreen

    Not long ago, I was yakking with someone I know well, and who knows me well, and who should know better, and she had the brass to tell me I’m not very hip.

    Me.

    Me, who practically invented droopy trousers.

    Me, who sings along with “Glee.”

    Me, who’s never actually tried sushi, but definitely would, so long as it’s thoroughly cooked.

  • A reason to ‘reminisce’: Wilmot fifth-grader wins local spelling bee

    Where do the top two spellers of the Evergreen-area schools’ spelling bee go to celebrate?

    Not to Disney World, but to Evergreen’s Baskin-Robbins.

    The top spellers, Wilmot fifth-graders Cal Schiff and Chris Guay, were pleased with their showing at the area spelling bee Feb. 7 at Parmalee Elementary School. They competed against 16 other students from Parmalee, Bergen Valley and Wilmot elementary schools, and Evergreen Middle School.

  • Book sorters telling a problematic tale

    Automated book sorters that cost the Jeffco Public Library $2.6 million and came with innumerable service headaches recently offered another surprise — the Swiss manufacturer Bibliotheca apparently used the library system as a beta test for one of the company’s complex machines.

    The book sorters — a computerized assembly of belts and rollers that scan and sort materials via radio-frequency chips implanted in them — were acquired to increase efficiency and reduce the number of staff required to sort books and return them to shelves.