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Local News

  • New House map transforms Evergreen’s district

    New boundaries for state House District 25 would dramatically alter the composition of the district that traditionally has had Evergreen as its epicenter, adding Park, Gilpin and Clear Creek counties and eliminating the portion of Jeffco north of I-70.

  • New emergency-medical fees taking effect Oct. 1

    The Evergreen Fire Protection District board unanimously passed a resolution Sept. 13 creating fees for various emergency-medical services that have traditionally been provided at no charge. The fees vary from $150 for treat-and-release to $875 for attempted resuscitation.

    The new policy is expected to generate about $50,000 a year in revenue from fees that were previously unbilled.

    Among other things, the fees will help pay for ambulance responses when the patient is treated and released but not taken to the hospital.

  • EDS to help fight litter on Lariat Loop

    EDS Waste Solutions Inc. is launching a cleanup campaign on Saturday, Sept. 17, in the wake of the Aug. 28 USA Pro Cycling Challenge, which made Lookout Mountain famous but also generated a litter surge along Lookout Mountain Road.

    Cleanup begins at Windy Saddle Park at 8 a.m. The photo ceremony is at 9 a.m. below the School of Mines’ "M."

  • County considering hefty charges to access public records

    The Jefferson County commissioners may soon be charging up to $50 an hour for access to certain public records.
    If approved, a revision to Jeffco’s policy manual would allow the county to charge the public for the time it takes staff to collect and occasionally redact documents, including the commissioners’ e-mails.
    Currently, the commissioners charge the public only for hard copies of documents, usually 25 cents per page after the first five pages.

  • New budget proposal would keep all libraries open

    No libraries would be closed under a revised budget presented Sept. 8 to the Jefferson County Public Library trustees.

    Instead, an anticipated $2.4 million shortfall would be addressed through other wide-ranging cuts — most notably through reduced hours at every library branch.

    The library board had earlier considered closing the Conifer, Wheat Ridge and Edgewater libraries to save about $695,000 annually. The branches would be spared under the revised budget that was created at behest of the county commissioners.

  • Oktoberfest volunteers get revved up about wunderbar raffle

    “They make cars. They make ‘em exactly the same way. One or two of ‘em turn out to be something special. Nobody knows why.”

    — Tennessee Steinmetz, in The Love Bug, 1968

    Going places is always more fun when you come home with something.

  • Designer birdhouses make benefit sing

    The stars of the second annual Bird House Bash, a benefit for Evergreen Audubon's Nature Center on Sept. 7, did not disappoint.

    Artistic creativity was exceptional among 19 professionally decorated and fabricated birdhouses available for auction at the evening affair, which included drinks at the Nature Center (or the Warming Hut in the winter) and dinner at the Lake House.

  • Sheriff's Calls

     

     

    One way to improve network programming

  • Low-cost firewood permits selling out

     

    Area residents who want to obtain low-cost firewood and help Denver Mountain Parks reduce wildfire fuels on park lands can still participate in a firewood sale offered by the Colorado State Forest Service. CSFS Golden district forester Allen Gallamore says anyone interested should request a permit soon.

    “Permits are still available, but are now limited in number because interest has really picked up with the cooler weather,” Gallamore said.

  • Big Chili Cook-off bigger than ever

    The September 2011 Big Chili Cook-off was more about Sept. 11, 2001, and only partly about the more than 100 kinds of chili on parade for the thousands of participants who attended the annual event benefiting five area fire districts.

    An estimated 5,000 people attended the event this year, up from 4,000 last year, although final figures weren't available at press time. Some 300 volunteers helped make it all happen.

    "We ran out of ballots, wrist bands and everything," said event director Kristin Witt.