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Local News

  • Fending off the fire threat

    Living in the Red Zone is one thing. But living in a neighborhood that experts ranked "extreme" in 2007 in terms of wildfire risk is downright scary.

    The Red Zone refers to areas of high wildfire risk as determined by a 1999 study by the Colorado State Forest Service. It includes a large part of Jefferson and Clear Creek counties.

    "We are the most imperiled neighborhood in two fire districts," said longtime Echo Hills resident Jessica Jay, a conservation law attorney with her own firm, Conservation Law.

  • 'Deck-side hunter' shocks quiet neighborhood

    A clash between homeowners and a home-based hunter with a license on Sept. 10 in Evergreen Highlands has reignited the controversy over hunting in residential neighborhoods in unincorporated Jefferson County.

    Hunting elk on private property in unincorporated Jeffco is legal as long as the bullet doesn't leave the boundaries. In the last couple of years, individual elk have been bagged in Paradise Hills, Cold Springs Ranch, Hiwan Golf Club and Indian Hills.

  • Interstate 70 bike-trail bypass gets construction funds

    The long-awaited prospect of a safe bicycle path along I-70, bypassing the interstate and covering the 2-mile stretch between the Genesee and El Rancho exits, could become a reality by 2013.

    The Colorado Department of Transportation has allocated $700,000 in FASTER safety-improvement funding for a bicycle path/non-motorized bypass. Surveyors could start work on it this fall. The total cost is estimated at $1.5 million to $2 million.

  • Lookout Mountain church eyes expansion but neighbors won't give blessing

    A small church on Lookout Mountain is seeking permission from Jefferson County to expand its footprint from 5,000 to 24,000 square feet and accommodate 900 people as opposed to the current 350. But neighbors are taking a dim view of the plans.

    Any expansion still has to be considered by the planning commission and approved by the Board of County Commissioners.

    The church is currently operating as a non-conforming use in a residentially zoned area.

  • Teen suspected of attempted murder, arson

    A 13-year-old girl arrested in connection with four fires was advised of the charges against her in Jefferson County Court on Monday afternoon.
    The teen was arrested last week on suspicion of attempted murder and arson in connection with three fires in April and one in September.
    The judge cleared the courtroom to protect the girl’s identity. Her family stood with her as she heard the charges, but her name will not be released because she is a minor. Bond was set at $20,000.

  • Downtown businesses rally to support Page family

    For the Courier

    Downtown Evergreen, an association of local businesses, is rallying to raise money for medical expenses accrued by the Page family while their son and brother, Spencer, battled cancer.  The 17-year-old Evergreen High School student died on Sept. 4.

    Spearheaded by Marmalade Jewelry owner Larae Evans and Green Merchant owner Micky Magnolo, “Spencer Page Day” will be Sunday, Sept. 25, in downtown Evergreen. At least 20 businesses will donate up to 20 percent of proceeds from sales that day to the Spencer Page Fund.

  • Sheriff's Calls

    Worst case scenario

  • Evergreen pilot at scene of air-race disaster

     

    By Jim Peterson

    For the Courier

    Evergreen resident John Penney and his daughter Heather were at the scene of the fatal crash last Friday at the Reno Air Races in Nevada, with the impact slamming Heather to the ground amid a hail of fuel and body parts.

     

    The crash killed 10 spectators and the pilot of the P-51 Mustang, which pitched suddenly skyward before nose-diving into the ground near a section of VIP box seats.

  • Crowd turns out in defense of South Table Mountain

    About 75 people turned out at a county planning commission meeting Sept. 14 to fight for preservation of South Table Mountain, including 399 acres privately owned by a local developer out of 2,000 or so total on the mesa.

    Some 21 individuals spoke in favor of preserving the mesa in its entirety. Only the property owner and developer Jeff Bradley defended its use as a future hypothetical corporate campus.

  • Open space survey going out by mail, Internet

    Jefferson County Open Space is working on a citizen survey designed to determine what aspects of Open Space parks are most important to the public and how satisfied they are with the park amenities and management policies, among other things.

    This is the first study of its type that Open Space has ever done involving a random sample.

    The benefit is it will capture the opinions of people who are not regular visitors or have never visited an Open Space park, said Open Space spokeswoman Thea Rock.