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Local News

  • Kittredge bridge repairs set for summer

    Bridge repairs are in the works this summer for the Myers Gulch Road bridge over Bear Creek at Kittredge. Built in 1963, the span is due for an upgrade.

    The new bridge will be 37 feet wide instead of 32 feet. It will have a new concrete deck, and guardrails will be installed on the sides.

    The bridge is expected to be closed occasionally during the day during construction, but there will be an alternate route through the neighborhood at Welch Avenue and Avenue F.

  • Forecasters expect normal to below-normal precipitation

    The weather outlook for April, May and June calls for more than a 1-in-3 chance for below-average precipitation for the entire state, according to the National Weather Service.

    "The long range is hard to judge, especially in the spring," said Scott Entrekin, a NOAA meteorologist in Boulder. "We are coming into more of a neutral condition. I wouldn't put a bet on being a lot warmer or a lot more dry. It's just going to be kind of normal."

  • Five finalists remain for Evergreen fire chief

    The fire chief selection committee has narrowed the number of candidates to five and is working on setting up in-person interviews with the finalists in May.

    The names of the finalists have not been released.

    At some point, the committee will announce the finalists, and they are expected to be interviewed by the entire board of the directors of the Evergreen Fire Protection District.

  • 42-acre additon proposed for Reynolds Park

    Jeffco Open Space will purchase 42 acres on Foxton Road as an addition to Reynolds Park, pending approval by the county commissioners.

    The Jefferson County Open Space Advisory Committee approved the staff proposal to buy the property from Willard Kent Faller Trust for $255,905.

    The decision came at a regular meeting of the committee March 1. The authorization approving negotiations was June 4, 2009.

  • Reverse-911 glitches fixed, county reports

    Glitches in the emergency notification system that caused a number of homes that were supposed to be evacuated during the Lower North Fork Fire to be passed over for reverse-911 calls have now been fixed, a Jefferson County official said.

    Problems with FirstCall Network, the emergency notification company that Jeffco uses, caused fewer than 120 homes in the evacuation area not to receive the evacuation call, according to Jeff Irvin, executive director of the Jefferson County Emergency Communications Authority.

  • Seniors' Resource Center seeking volunteers amid national observance

    By Sandy Barnes

    For the Courier

    The Seniors' Resource Center in Evergreen is highlighting the need for volunteers to assist older residents with home repairs and other services during National Volunteer Week beginning April 15.

    "We're looking to serve the needy seniors," said SRC-Evergreen director Jane Weinberger. "A lot of people don't realize that many older people don't have the resources to get things done."

  • Whodunnit to help fund bronze statue of GI

    By Jerry Williams

    For the Courier

    Watching a murder and trying to figure out whodunnit will help the Evergreen Rotary Club and American Legion Post 2001 pay for a commemorative bronze statue of a soldier “to represent all veterans of all wars.”

  • Week of presentations precedes Earth Day Fair

    For the Courier

    What kills tens of thousands of animals each year? What costs more than $4 billion to produce, is made from petroleum, and takes up to 1,000 years to biodegrade? Can you believe that 100 billion of this impractical and damaging product are used annually?

  • Firefighter likes helping neighbors, but dreads facing the devastation

    Being a firefighter in your own neighborhood has its rewards, and yet it can be emotionally draining — as it was during the Lower North Fork Fire.
    Wendy Zechman, a volunteer firefighter with Elk Creek since 2009, cut her spring-break trip short to help fight the flames.

     

  • When all winds become ill winds

    Kristen Moeller used to love the sound of the wind.

    But since she and her husband, David Cottrell, lost their home in the Lower North Fork Fire two weeks ago, the wind doesn’t sound the same.

    “It used to sound so musical,” she said. “Now it sounds harsh.”

    Moeller and Cottrell’s home off Kuehster Road and Rocky Top Trail was one of 27 houses turned to ash by the fast-moving fire that burned about 4,100 acres south of Conifer.