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Local News

  • New financial controller begins work with Evergreen park district

    Jason Leslie has been hired as financial controller for the Evergreen Park and Recreation District. He is replacing Karen Messler, who left the district earlier this year to accept a part-time position.
    Before joining EPRD, Leslie was the controller for the Commerce City government. During his seven-year tenure with the city, Leslie was responsible for streamlining and implementing processes to accommodate the growing community.

  • Decorated eggs to be displayed at Evergreen National Bank

    More than 100 decorated eggs will be revealed in their oval-shaped glory at a kickoff party for the annual egg-decorating contest on Thursday, April 2, from 6 to 8 p.m. at Evergreen National Bank.

  • Drop in water use creates more available taps in Evergreen Metro District

    The number of available taps is increasing in the Evergreen Metropolitan District because customers in its service area are using less water, said Dave Lighthart, EMD general manager.

    “We haven’t increased our water supply,” Lighhart said. “Our supply is determined by water rights. We have a maximum amount of water.”

  • 2 Evergreen residents among winners of Ice Melt Barrel Contest

    Evergreen resident Jean Wells is the first-place winner of the annual Ice Melt Barrel Contest sponsored by Mountain Foothills Rotary. Wells won $1,000 for most closely predicting the time and date that the Ice Melt Barrel dropped into Evergreen Lake. Her estimate of 1:05:10 p.m. March 21 was within a few minutes of the actual time of 12:50:23 p.m. determined by members of the club. 

    Other winners also came close to guessing the exact time the barrel descended into the lake on March 21.

  • EHS inviting community members to Diversity Day

    Evergreen High School’s Diversity Day is April 24, and this year organizers want the community to get involved.

    Diversity Day promotes awareness among students about different people and cultures. Even though it sounds a bit corny, organizers hope that education will bring understanding and ultimately create a world that isn’t built on judgment and hate.

    This year’s Diversity Day coincides with the national Day Without Hate, an effort to stop bullying in schools.

  • What’s good and bad about downtown Evergreen?

    Downtown Evergreen has a blend of established businesses and new ones putting down roots, and their customers sometimes struggle to find a parking place and walk precariously along Main Street where the sidewalks end. 

    During a March 24 meeting on potential updates to a community plan for Evergreen, Jeffco planner Russell Clark asked attendees to identify “the good and the bad” in the downtown area. 

    Later, a reporter asked downtown business owners for their own answers to that question.

  • School district negotiating groups raise questions regarding Open Meetings Law

    The recent move by Jeffco Public Schools and the teachers union to take portions of contract negotiations behind closed doors falls into a murky area of Colorado’s Open Meetings Law.

    The district and the Jefferson County Education Association opened negotiations this month, and both sides agreed early on to break into small study groups and examine several priority topics. The two groups announced last week that meetings of the small groups would not be open to the public.

  • Fire destroys home in Evergreen subdivision

    Fire destroyed a house in the Blue Valley subdivision in Evergreen on Tuesday afternoon, after the home's residents were forced to evacuate.

    No injuries occurred in the blaze at 101 Bluebell Lane, which was reported about 2:15 p.m. The house was engulfed in flames when firefighters from the Clear Creek Fire Authority and Evergreen Fire/Rescue arrived, the Clear Creek Sheriff's Office reported.

  • Pottery exhibit reflects history of Indian Hills

    The Pottery of Indian Hills exhibit at the Hiwan Homestead Museum in Evergreen reflects an era when a pueblo flourished in the mountain community.

    The brightly glazed works in hues of turquoise and brown were created at the abandoned NaTeSo Pueblo in Indian Hills, which Willard Spence of Denver purchased in 1949. After attempting to revive the pueblo that George Olinger, a developer of Indian Hills, established as a tourist attraction in the early 1920s, Spence began making pottery at the site. 

  • Updating Kittredge's community plan

    As Bear Creek flows through Kittredge, the stream defines and shapes the community, residents pointed out at a meeting hosted by Jeffco planners on March 17.

    Most commercial development in Kittredge is near the creek, which borders Highway 74.

    Many residences, including the Sun Ridge subdivision, are built high on a ridge above the stream, which flows from the community down Bear Creek Canyon into Morrison.