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Education

  • Evergreen students display their tech skills at event

    The Evergreen Schools Tech Extravaganza on April 23 was similar to a school science fair — only with students displaying their technology prowess as they explored a variety of topics from geology to understanding grief.

    More than 100 students from the Bergens and Wilmot elementary schools, Evergreen Middle and Evergreen High set up laptops on tables in the EHS library and two classrooms. Students and parents strolled through to hear about the students’ work. They used a variety of programs to explain their research and display their results.

  • Evergreen Middle School observes Day Without Hate

    While Evergreen High School was celebrating Diversity Day on Friday, Evergreen Middle School was celebrating the national Day Without Hate, a program the school has embraced for five years.

    “Not all schools have embraced Day Without Hate as much as EMS,” said Julie Maus, the leadership liaison to the EMS PTA. “We’ve been trying to make it more intrinsic in the school to promote diversity. We want it to become part of the school culture.”

  • EHS will see decrease in funding

    Jeffco Public Schools’ new student-based budgeting policy will mean Evergreen High School will lose about $150,000 for the 2015-16 school year.

    Principal Ryan Alsup is predicting an additional $180,000 reduction for the 2016-17 school year, assuming the district budgeting model is retained and state funding remains as projected.

    For the 2015-16 school year, Alsup is cutting an assistant principal position, the instructional coach position and half of a teacher position to make up the loss, trying to keep the reductions away from classrooms.

  • Evergreen High students learn about racism, genocide, alternative lifestyles

    Hard-hitting issues such as racism, genocide and alternative lifestyles were the key focus of Diversity Day at Evergreen High School on Friday. Students participated in a variety of workshops led by people promoting awareness and understanding of societal issues.

  • King-Murphy students revved for repurposing

    King-Murphy Elementary School is sowing the seeds of conservation.

    The school has been celebrating the 45th anniversary of Earth Day, which is April 22, with a presentation by the regional administrator from the Environmental Protection Agency and the EPA mascot, Froggy. Students also participated in a repurposing challenge in which they took trash and found new uses for it.

  • Teachers union sues over pay-for-performance policy

    Jeffco’s teachers union is suing the school district over its divisive pay-for-performance policy, which is still in its first year.

    The Jefferson County Education Association’s lawsuit, filed April 7 amid contract negotiations with the teachers, asserts that the district’s pay plan was unilaterally implemented without union input, and that it will cause irreparable harm to teachers’ interests. The suit also claims the policy violated an existing contract with the teachers. 

  • School board member apologizes for Facebook post

    A school board member who publicly shared a link on Facebook calling for parents to protest Friday’s LGBT Day of Silence said she didn’t read the post before sharing it and feels “sickened” over its message.

  • Jeffco schools could get less money from the state

    Proposed cuts by lawmakers in the K-12 portion of Gov. John Hickenlooper’s 2015-16 state budget could mean that Jeffco Public Schools receives $17.5 million less than anticipated.

    Hickenlooper’s funding plan would have provided the district $37 million in state funds; $17.2 million of that would have gone toward ongoing costs, while $19.8 million would have been earmarked for one-time expenditures. 

  • School district negotiating groups raise questions regarding Open Meetings Law

    The recent move by Jeffco Public Schools and the teachers union to take portions of contract negotiations behind closed doors falls into a murky area of Colorado’s Open Meetings Law.

    The district and the Jefferson County Education Association opened negotiations this month, and both sides agreed early on to break into small study groups and examine several priority topics. The two groups announced last week that meetings of the small groups would not be open to the public.

  • Study groups take over in teacher contract talks

    Jeffco Public Schools and the teachers union have agreed to take part of their current contract negotiations behind closed doors.

    The sides agreed early on to form small groups made up of representatives and experts to examine several priority topics. The smaller groups will meet to come up with options before the full bargaining teams gather again to hammer out a final agreement. The next public negotiations are slated for April 13.