.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Education

  • Under your spell: Kids have ‘audacious’ time during annual bee

    The art of spelling is alive and well in Evergreen.

    In an age where spell-check is the easy fix, 17 students from Bergen Valley, Parmalee and Wilmot elementary schools and Evergreen Middle School competed Feb. 4 in the annual Evergreen spelling bee. In the spelling bees, students must spell out loud without any aids such as paper and pencil or computers. This year’s bee was at Wilmot.

  • Bergen Valley third-graders learn about homelessness

    Third-graders at Bergen Valley Elementary School learned a valuable lesson about the meaning of homelessness.

    The children recently heard from a speaker from the St. Francis Center, a day shelter for homeless people in Denver. The students wore pajamas to school to symbolize people who don’t have beds of their own, and they collected socks that the center distributes to homeless people, estimating that they donated more than 2,000 pairs.

  • High tech goes old school

    Evergreen Middle School is using new technology to teach old-school shop classes.

    With the help of video-making software, along with iPads and laptops, seventh-graders are learning how to use drills, lathes and other tools to create wooden cars.

  • Keeping the balls in the air

    Balls, scarves and rings flew through the air last week as Wilmot Elementary School students learned the art of juggling.

    Chris Morgan, Wilmot’s physical education student teacher last semester, returned for two weeks as an artist-in-residence to teach the children the hand-eye coordination needed to keep one, two and three objects in the air.

  • Kids join cancer battle

    A new club at King-Murphy Elementary School collected hundreds of dollars at a bake sale last week, but its real goal was to show kindness and empathy for children with cancer.

    The four fifth-graders who are members of the TCCC — Taking Care of Cancer Club — donated the proceeds from their two-day bake sale to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., and to the Children’s Hospital Colorado cancer unit.

  • A peach of a reading program

    James Henry Trotter and his evil aunts visited Marshdale Elementary School on Friday.

    James’ name might sound familiar, because he is the main character is Roald Dahl’s book “James and the Giant Peach.”

     

    James, along with Aunt Striker and Aunt Sponge, appeared at a school-wide assembly to entice the students to read the book.

  • Montessori fifth-graders teach younger pupils about healthy habits

    “Wash, wash, wash your hands,

    Make them nice and clean,

    Scrub the bottoms and the tops,

    And fingers in between.”

    To see Emma Drozdel and Maddy Gottlob give their presentation, you’d think they were professional public speakers with hundreds of appearances under their belts.

    Emma and Maddy, both 10-year-old fifth-graders, were among the students at Montessori School of Evergreen who treated the younger pupils to a 9News Health Fair on Dec. 18.

  • A lesson in compassion: Students at Bergens pull together to help friend with cancer

    The third-graders at Bergen Valley Elementary School have learned firsthand the meaning of compassion.

    One of their fellow students, 9-year-old Kaymen Story, was diagnosed in September with a bone cancer called osteosarcoma. Since then, Kaymen has been through chemotherapy and surgery to remove the malignant bone tumor on her left radius near her wrist.

  • Marshdale Elementary class streamed live as part of Discovery Education program

    Assistant No. 7 looked a little nervous as she was called to the front of the room. And the trepidation was not unwarranted — she was about to appear live in front of an audience of hundreds.

    For a third-grader, that’s big-time.

  • EHS band takes fourth place at state competition

    The Evergreen High School marching band accomplished its best performance in many years, ranking fourth in the state 3A competition recently.

    For the band’s drum majors, the feeling of making the finals and then taking fourth was exhilarating. They said it’s the first time in 60 years that the band made it into the top five.

    “The entire band put everything into that performance,” said drum major Norika Zehnder, “and that’s incredible.”