• Conservative board members approve $9,500 in bonuses for superintendent

    Jeffco schools Superintendent Dan McMinimee will be paid $9,500 in bonuses after his first year of work, the outgoing school board decided on a 3-2 vote Nov. 5.

    McMinimee’s awards represent 24 percent of possible bonuses in his contract. The bonuses hinged on his meeting goals set by the district and the school board.

  • Student performance on PARCC test falls short of expectations

    More than half of the Colorado third- through 11th-graders who took the controversial PARCC exams last spring did not meet expectations in math and English language arts, according to data released by the Colorado Department of Education.

    Last fall, thousands of Colorado high-schoolers made headlines by refusing to take the Colorado Measures of Academic Success exams, which were developed by the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers, a multi-state group that uses Common Core standards.

  • Voters recall conservative members of school board

    Jeffco’s conservative school board majority was overwhelmingly recalled in the Nov. 3 election, and the so-called “clean slate” of candidates backed by the Jefferson County Education Association and the recall organizers swept all five seats on the board.

    As of Nov. 6, unofficial results showed:

    • 64.3 percent voted to recall Julie Williams in District 1. Brad Rupert, the sole successor candidate, received all votes cast to replace her.

  • Outgoing school board majority approves charter school

    The outgoing conservative majority on Jeffco’s school board approved an application from a group that wants to establish a charter school in north Jeffco, despite concerns raised by staff and the district accountability committee.

  • Veteran EHS teacher receives the Hero Award

    Tears were shed when Evergreen High veteran social studies teacher Scott Haebe was told he was one of three Jeffco teachers receiving the Hero Award this year.

    Science teacher Ali Meyers made the presentation at a recent faculty meeting. Meyers knows Haebe both as a colleague and as one of her teachers/mentors when she was an EHS student.

    She fought back tears as she talked about the impact Haebe has had on her life and on the lives of students and colleagues.

  • Pumpkin proves to be great geography teacher

    Marshdale Elementary fifth-graders decorated pumpkins for Halloween, though not in the traditional sense.

    The students turned 29 pumpkins into globes featuring continents, oceans, mountain ranges and rivers, and the pumpkin globes are displayed in businesses throughout Conifer, Marshdale and Evergreen.

    By creating the world pumpkins, the students learned about geography and working with partners, and they embraced the unique Halloween decorating experience.

    The globe pumpkins were not carved; rather, they were painted with bright colors.

  • Science is putty in their hands

    What could be more fun for youngsters than making homemade Silly Putty during their Halloween celebration?

    Parmalee Elementary students were treated to spooky science assemblies on Friday that also featured chemistry lessons. The students were divided into two groups starting with the kindergartners through second-graders. The children sat in the gym holding bags of white stuff that they squished to make the putty.

    The bags contained equal amounts of glue and cornstarch. Sometimes more glue had to be added.

  • BYOD program at Evergreen Middle has students bringing their own devices

    Evergreen Middle School is planning to start a program called BYOD — bring your own device — in January that will have students bring tablet-like electronic devices to school every day for use in classes.

    “This doesn’t mean that they will use the tablets in every class every minute of the day,” said principal Joelle Broberg. “It means the technology will be available when it is appropriate in the classroom.”

  • 8th-graders at EMS take field trip to Elk Meadow

    Nearly 240 Evergreen Middle School eighth-graders recently traversed Elk Meadow to experience what it must have been like for the Lewis and Clark expedition — the explorers who mapped most of the western United States in the early 19th century.

    Students mapped Elk Meadow’s physical features and cataloged the plants and animals they found. They realized that, as part of the first-explorers scenario, they could name different parts of Elk Meadow what they wanted.

  • Sculptures lend class to EHS halls

    Sculptures adorn sections of the Evergreen High hallways, thanks to the school’s sculpture class.

    “The idea was to have students create something where the chosen site is enlivened … to bring attention to a place,” art teacher Matt Clagett said. “The intention is to transform the space.”

    He called them installation site sculptures. Clagett said he wanted the sculptures to be interactive, but that wasn’t a requirement.