• Action against former Journey pastor won’t be refiled

    The state agency that sought to have a former Conifer pastor banned from selling securities in Colorado will not refile the action in an administrative court, staff said several weeks after the original case was dismissed.

    Former Journey Community Church pastor Michael Cheshire was accused of securities fraud related to a bond offering the church made in 2013; state investigators sought to have him banned from selling securities in Colorado again. The church — which no longer exists — was also named.

  • Card ‘skimmers’ found at Safeway in Conifer

    Card “skimmers” were found on PIN transaction devices at several Colorado Safeway stores — including in Conifer, a company spokeswoman has said.

    Safeway spokeswoman Teena Massingill said the devices, which are designed to collect information from the magnetic strips on the back of credit and debit cards, were found by staff members during regular inspections in November and were quickly removed.

    “There was a very small impact to our customers,” Massingill said.

  • Securities commissioner rejects recommendation absolving church pastor

    Colorado’s securities commissioner has reached a mixed decision in the administrative case examining whether a former Conifer-area pastor accused of securities fraud should be banned from selling securities in the state.

    Securities Commissioner Gerald Rome rejected a recommendation in favor of former Journey Community Church pastor Michael Cheshire from a panel of state Securities Board members who heard several hours of testimony.

  • Mountains Taxi suspends service

    Mountains Taxi has temporarily suspended service because of a big jump in premiums for auto liability insurance.

    “We didn’t receive the new quote until the eleventh hour, and it was an increase of 22 percent,” said Chris Phelps, an owner of Mountains Taxi. Phelps said the company halted service on Nov. 11.

    “We have some customers with special needs, and those folks are really struggling because they need us,” said Phelps, who said the company had been providing 50 to 60 rides a day.

  • Area business leaders discuss hiring challenges

    Lack of transportation, a lack of affordable rental housing and low wages continue to affect the Evergreen area's economy, business leaders say.

    Companies in the area often can't find and hire the employees they need, business leaders said at a July 29 forum at The Wild Game in Bergen Park and sponsored by Evergreen Christian Outreach and the Evergreen Pathfinders.

  • Echo Mountain will again become public ski area

    Echo Mountain Resort is planning to open as a public ski area on Dec. 10 for the upcoming 2015-16 ski season, according to owner Nora Pykkonen.

    The 226-acre ski area on Squaw Pass Road has been operating privately as a venue for the Front Range Ski Club since 2012. Pykkonen Capital LLC bought the ski area in August 2012 for $1.53 million, according to county records.

  • Jeffco business delivers a hot commodity

    Danny Cash Hot Sauce is a business that does things its own way.

    Or as hot sauce guru Danny Cichon — who prefers to be called “Danny Cash” — puts it: “We step in our own direction.”

  • BUSINESS BEAT: Scrumptious food for thought

    The owner of the new French bakery/café in El Rancho has a personality that is as appetizing as the items in her dessert cases.

    Oksana Romanoff, a Russian-born chef and baker who moved to the United States two years ago and Evergreen recently, is honest, passionate and a perfectionist, and she doesn’t mince words about the types of food she is creating for her new Evergreen audience at Kseni Mademoiselle.

  • Evergreen resident solves marketing riddle

    What's a more creative way to say "I love you"?

    That question plagued Evergreen resident Helene Hughes as she wrote notes for her children’s lunch boxes every day when they were growing up. 

    Hughes’ musings led her to create "Symbuzzles" (from the words “symbols” and “puzzles”): word-picture puzzle cards that her kids could figure out.

  • Foothills housing market popping, real estate agents say

    Real estate agents are using several adjectives to describe the foothills housing market, especially for homes priced below $500,000: hot, a frenzy, popping.

    “It’s the most active market I’ve seen in my 30 years in so far as multiple offers and prices being bid up over ask,” said real estate agent Wayne Shephard of Shephard Realty. “Homes priced correctly are being sold almost immediately.”