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Business

  • Prague coming to Evergreen — the café, that is

    Evergreen is getting a new restaurant downtown called Prague, which will be a smaller version of the popular Café Prague in Morrison.

    Set to open in mid-October, Prague will serve lunch and dinner, said Tomas Stibral, who owns both restaurants with his wife, Yvona. It will be at the corner of Main Street and Forest Hill Road in a building that once was a dry cleaner and a hardware store.

    The restaurant will seat about 50 people with another 30 seats on the patio, a size he called perfect.

  • Smiling Moose smiling even wider in new location

    The Smiling Moose Deli has moved to a larger location in the log building off Evergreen Parkway in the El Rancho area.

    The sandwich shop has been near Interstate 70 since March 2008, and it had simply outgrown its space, said owner Derek Dodds.

    “It’s in bigger space and gave us a better opportunity,” Dodds said.

    The new restaurant at 908 Nob Hill Road has doubled the number of seats in its dining area, which was a big impetus to move, he said, plus the larger space has allowed the restaurant to add a create-your-own-salad offering.

  • Europe comes to Marshdale

    The new owners of a bakery in Marshdale want it to have a local European pastry shop feel.

    The Village Patisserie at 6947 County Highway 73, owned by David and Sara Knight, offers a selection of delectable treats, jellies and jams — and homemade ice cream on Sundays — plus a smattering of local artwork. Decorated cakes from the elegant to the unusual also can be ordered.

    The shop is open Wednesday through Sunday. Saturday is bread-baking day, and on Sundays everything in the display case is 50 percent off.

  • Skin treatments available at Aesthetic Lounge

    The Aesthetic Lounge in Evergreen is all about skin.
    Colorado is a place where sun and wind can wreak havoc on skin, and The Aesthetic Lounge can help minimize the damage and make people look more youthful.
    Owner Leigh Ann Jordan said everything done at the shop is medical grade, and in addition to the typical injectables and facial treatments, it also does what she calls odd things such as laser treatments for foot fungus.

  • BUSINESS BEAT: Menchie’s no stranger to community support

    If you participated in Evergreen’s Freedom Run on July 4th, chances are you received a goody bag at the end of the race, including a coupon for Menchie’s in Bergen Village.
    In addition, on that day, Menchie’s donated 15 percent of its sales to Mt. Evans Home Health and Hospice.

  • BUSINESS BEAT: Bike, ski store races into Bergen Park

    Bike and ski racers now have a place in Bergen Park to buy their equipment.

    A Culture of Speed closed its doors in Dumont and opened a shop just east of the Whippletree at 1342 County Road 65. The shop operates in the front of the building, while JR’s Landscaping operates in the back.

    Owner Harry Rhulen, who lives in Soda Creek, said the move to Bergen Park was a no-brainer.

  • The Angry Llama migrates home

    The Angry Llama is feeling less mad these days after returning to its Conifer roots.

    The restaurant reopened April 10 at the Conifer Crossings building, the Angry Llama’s original space.

    “We really wanted to come back to Conifer,” said Cortland Coffey, student director for Journey Community Church. “A lot of people missed having a place to just come and hang out.”

  • Loaf & Jug employee honored for service to customers

    Taking care of customers is what it’s all about for Christy “Red” Mills at the Loaf & Jug in Bergen Park.

    Her rapport with customers led to her receiving the company’s President’s Choice Award for outstanding customer service.

    Mills was one of four employees selected from among the company’s 3,000 locations in seven states and received a Waterford crystal vase.

  • Village Gourmet celebrates 30 years of good tastes, times

    The Village Gourmet is a shop that appeals to the senses.

    When you walk into the Bergen Park kitchenware and gift shop, your nose is greeted with the smell of fresh-brewed coffee. Samples always are available by the door.

    Your eyes see the vibrant colors of everything from dishes and kitchen gadgets to gourmet food and cookware.

    Your fingers can touch the soft towels and shiny pot and pans.

    If you walk to the back of the shop, your taste buds can partake in handmade chocolate truffles.

  • Lack of business prompts closure of El Rancho restaurant

    The historic El Rancho restaurant has closed, and it remains uncertain whether it will reopen under new operators.

    Mark Johnston, who has leased the restaurant from property owner Doug Antonoff, closed the establishment in November because of financial losses.

    “There just wasn’t enough business to sustain it,” said Johnston, who lives in Detroit. “We were doing about $1,000 in business a day with $3,000 in costs. You can do the math. I just couldn’t go any longer.” About 20 employees were laid off as a result of the closure.