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Today's Features

  • “If you give a man a fish, he is hungry again in an hour; if you teach him to catch a fish, you do him a good turn."

    — Anne Isabella Ritchie

    Friendship Bridge is not about giving food to poor women in Guatemala; it is about doing a good turn by helping them start businesses, so they can feed their own families.

  • If you ask Warren Rose what his favorite day of the week is, he’ll say it’s Tuesday.
    That’s because he dedicates Tuesdays to volunteering at the Seniors’ Resource Center in Evergreen — and making many new friends.
    “I look forward to going in there on my volunteer days and seeing my friends,” Rose said.
    Now in its 35th year, SRC’s mission is to coordinate services to enhance independence, dignity and quality of life for seniors.

  • An Evergreen couple are participating in a cycling event, but it’s not your everyday bike ride: It’s a 350-mile benefit through — and for — Israel.

    It’s also a journey back to their roots.

    Jonathan and Beth Miller, members of Congregation Beth Evergreen, are raising money for the Arava Institute for Environmental Studies and a nonprofit organization called Hazon, both of which promote healthy living and sustainability in Israel.

  • Colorado’s name means “colored red” and is linked to the Colorado River. The river was dubbed “Rio Colorado” by early Spanish explorers because of the red color silt it carries from the mountains. When the area became an official territory in 1861, officials believed the term would be an apt moniker for our colorful lands. 

  • "I love babies," said Evergreen resident Kathy Magnani.
    In the past 10 years, Magnani has spent more that 850 hours giving comfort to tiny infants in the neonatal intensive-care unit at Presbyterian/St. Luke's Medical Center in Denver. Each Thursday morning, she goes to the hospital and holds a baby for two hours.
    "My job is to go in to cuddle these babies," Magnani said with a big smile.

  • It is an apparently immutable law of hydrology that each uncommon rise in the waters of Bear Creek is attended by a simultaneous and equal rise in public anxiety regarding Evergreen Dam.

  • Hundreds of Männer, Frauen und Kinder packed Buchanan Park for the fourth annual Oktoberfest on Sunday for some traditional German fare, music, food and, of course, beer.

    The event was originally scheduled for Sept. 22 at the Evergreen Lake House, but the date and location were changed because of September’s flooding and the resulting damage.

  • Despite a preview of winter the day before, Aspen Ridge Church in Marshdale staged a successful Hay Day fall festival on Saturday. 

    The four-hour gathering at the church featured everything from local food and crafts to a pumpkin patch, hayrides and animal feedings, with free hot cider and chili to chase the chill.

  • Did you ever wish there was a book that could tell you everything you need to know to be successful in life? In the case of StageDoor Theatre’s upcoming production of "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying," the talented high school players don’t need a book to succeed. This silly and satirical production pokes fun at corporate culture and effortlessly transports the audience straight back to the skinny ties and A-line dresses of the "Mad Men" era.

  • For 15 years, the “Mountain Man” bronze sculpture has stood below the Evergreen Lake dam, a silent tribute to the resilience of the pioneers who settled Colorado, particularly Evergreen.

    In 2013, in the wake of September’s incessant rain and subsequent flooding of Bear Creek, the sculpture continues to pay tribute to the resilience of flood victims in Evergreen and Colorado.

    The sculpture of a mountain man on a horse going down a steep rocky slope is 11 feet tall and is mounted on a 3-foot pedestal. It was front-hoof-deep in water on Sept. 13.